Category: Hybrid Crafting

Hybrid How-To | Custom Holiday Place Cards

Hello, and welcome to another edition of our Hybrid How-To series here on The Digital Press blog! Today, I am excited to show you how I made some quick, simple personalized place cards for my Thanksgiving day table!

We don’t have a huge crowd for Thanksgiving, but everyone likes to feel welcome and know where they’re sitting… so these place cards are both pretty and functional. And of course, you can use your digital kits for any type of celebration, but with Thanksgiving right around the corner I thought I would get these ready to go in hopes it will motivate me that this is happening in just a few weeks!

My first step was to select a digital kit to work with; I chose this beautiful kit from Rachel Etrog Designs called Grateful Heart

I was drawn to the colors of this kit, as I knew they would work with my tablecloth and dishes. I also loved that sweet winter wreath, and the tags, and the flowers… and so on.

Once I had selected a kit to work with, it was time to decide upon on a basic design for my place cards. Using the wreath element along with some digital paint and solid colored digital papers, I drew out a 4 x 6 white card in Photoshop Elements (PSE). Then I applied the wreath and the “thankful for” word art to each card. I used the blank spaces to print some of my favorite printed papers and elements.

You can see how my pages looked in PSE (below). I then printed them as an 8.5″ x 11″ sheet on my Canon Pixar printer using matte presentation paper.

I also decided to add a simple blessing to the back side using more of the pattern papers. To do so, I just made a rectangle template inside the 4 x 6 card and added the solid paper… and then I typed in my words in PSE. I made a stroke around the inside rectangle, using one of the colors in the paper….I then cut and punched out all my cards and elements. I used different sizes of circle and banner punches with solid papers, patterned papers, and some vellum…


I basically played with the elements, putting the different shapes and sizes together until I got something I liked…

In using these layered embellishments, I was trying to give the cards some dimension… so I used a small tool and my fingers to “ruffle” the edges of one of the layers of paper in the flower, as shown here…

After securing everything on the front side with glue, tape and pop dots, I put the front and backs together. I secured them with a piece of scotch tape on the wrong side, and some pretty gold striped washi on the right side. Then I rounded the corners on the front of the card and attached a bow made out of string…

Then I cut out a few stars from my left over paper and found some sequins and glued them on the front for more interest and added dimension…

Here’s a look at the finished project on my table…

And that’s it! Super cute, and fun to make!

I hope I’ve inspired you to use your own digital products to make some holiday place cards! If you give this project a try, we would love to see pictures of your completed projects in the Hybrid Gallery at The Digital Press!

Happy crafting, everyone!


About the Author  KerriAnne is a homebody who resides in the desert southwest. She started scrapbooking when her kids were little, and hasn’t stopped despite the teenagers rolling their eyes and sticking out their tongues! When not scrapping or being a chauffeur, she can be found consuming large amounts of iced coffee.

Hybrid How-To | Monster Banner

Hello, and welcome to another edition of our Hybrid How-To series here on The Digital Press blog! Today, I am so excited to be sharing my very first post with you after joining TDP’s team a few months ago — and with Halloween right around the corner, I thought I’d show you how to easily use your favorite digital supplies to create a fun Halloween banner.

I knew I wanted to make some cool, spooky, Halloween decor… and this project was actually so easy to complete, my 6 year old son helped me out (and then claimed the finished product for himself… which means I might have to make another one!).

First, I found the artwork that I wanted to use in the shop at The Digital Press. I wanted a banner of monsters (cute ones though, not too scary!)… and I found the perfect product in Julia Makotinsky’s Wee Bit Spooky 3×4 Cards, shown here…

Next, I made 2 banner shapes in my Silhouette Studio software by simply altering the bottom of a 3×4 rectangle (see next image). Once I had my shapes the way I wanted them, I dragged the pocket card artwork from the folder and dropped it into the middle of each shape, as shown here…

*NOTE* You could definitely do this in a photo editing program like Photoshop (PS) or Photoshop Elements (PSE) using clipping masks — but — because I copied & pasted the bottom two shapes and simply turned them around to nest with the top ones, the Silhouette software automatically rotated the artwork for me so that the monsters were facing the right way. This is why I didn’t do it in Photoshop with a mask; I would have had to manually rotate them! Instead, Silhouette Studio did the work for me — but it would certainly be easy enough to use another program, too.

Next, I printed them with registration marks so that I could print and cut, but once they were out of the printer my son wanted to cut them out, so I actually ended up giving him half of them and a pair of scissors… and just cut the rest out myself.

Once they were all cut out, I used my WRMK hole punch to punch a 1/4″ hole in each top corner (see next image)… and then we carefully strung them onto some yarn to hang up with our other Halloween garlands…

You can see from the close up image, above, that I strung them onto the yarn in opposite ways (some from back-to-front… and others from front-to-back). This helps them stay in place a little better, and they don’t end up in a bunch at the bottom of the string because each one will stop the next one from sliding down the whole string.

Here’s a look at my finished project, decorating my crafty office space…

I hope this inspires you to create one of your own for some holiday decorating this weekend! I know excitement for Halloween is very high in my house right now, and this was a really fun and easy project to do with my child!

Thanks for checking it out!


About the Author Amy Jo Vanden Brink is a Canadian mom, wife, music teacher, and scrapbooker who always takes on too many projects and loves to craft.  She is terrible at baking cookies, but great at eating them… and loves having a clean house, but hates cleaning the house! She lives in Edmonton with her husband, her son, and their pup Farley.

 

Hybrid How-To | Lacing Cards

Hello, everyone! Welcome to another edition of our Hybrid How-To series here on The Digital Press blog! Today, I am here to show you how to make these adorable lacing cards using digital elements from your favorite digital kits.

 

Supplies Needed

  • Digital kit of your choice (I used Be A Unicorn by Mari Koegelenberg)
  • Cardstock
  • Scissors (or cutting machine if you prefer)
  • Hole punch
  • Yarn
  • Yarn needle

The first step is to select the images you want. I try and stick with simple images that will be easy to trace with yarn. The unicorn in this was more complicated than I would normally want, but I just really wanted that unicorn!

I enlarged them a bit, added two images per page, printed and cut them out.

I used an eyelet punch to make the holes around each image. Make sure the yarn needle can fit through the punch you’re using.

And that’s it! They’re ready to go.

I used to laminate them to give them more durability, but our local lamination place shut down and so I started letting the kids use them without the laminate and found it was just fine. Because they’re so quick to make, I can easily print and cut new ones using new images each time. My kids love lacing cards!

 


Kate About the Author  Kate is on the hybrid team here at The Digital Press. She lives on the Utah/Colorado border with her husband, 5 kids, 10 chickens, a dog named Gracie, and a cat named Kit. She’s a city-born girl who found she’s really a country girl at heart. She can be found outside, barefoot, and probably in her garden.

Hybrid How-To | Halloween Memory Game

Hello everyone! It’s Tanya here, and I’m excited to bring you another edition of our Hybrid How-To series here on The Digital Press blog! Today I’m going to show you how to use your digital supplies to make a cute kids’ Halloween-themed memory game. It’s a super easy project that can even be given to your child’s classmates instead of candy (we all know there will be enough candy already, right?).

First things first… a peek at the Halloween-themed kits from the shop at TDP that I chose to use for this project…

Witch Please by Rachel Etrog Designs

The Haunted House by Julia Makotinsky

Color Blocks: Halloween Elements by Julia Makotinsky

SUPPLIES NEEDED:

  1. Themed digital products (see my choices, above)
  2. White cardstock paper
  3. Double-sided tape
  4. Paper cutter or scissors (or a cutting machine)

I used Silhouette Business Edition to create this fun project; I use it for all my projects because I find the software pretty easy to use. However, using a cutting machine and related software is NOT necessary; you can also create the same thing using any photo editing software program, and some scissors or a few paper punches.

HOW TO MAKE THE MEMORY GAME:

The first step is to draw out a shape for your game pieces (I used the rounded square)…

This project will have two sides: one side with just patterned paper, and the other with the elements. After choosing a shape for the game pieces, it’s time to fill-in one side with patterned paper (if you’re using another photo editing program like Photoshop, etc… you can use your shape as a clipping mask and “clip” the patterned paper to the shape).

Once applying your paper to your game pieces shape, you can alter the pattern size, if desired…

Now, you’ll replicate this shape/pattern combo across the page… by grouping that selection and then replicating down…

Once the page is filled, you will turn ‘on’ the cut lines (if using a cutting machine), put on your mat, and run it through your cutting machine…

Make sure to keep your image from touching any of the registration marks.

Next, for the back of the game pieces… you will first fill with the paper pattern of your choice, and then add elements on top of that. Make sure to use each image on two separate game pieces (to allow for a match!)…

*TIP* You can use on sheet of paper by drawing a large square out and filling it with paper of your choice (no cut lines for this side)  Once printed flip it over, put pack in printer and cut the element side of the paper.

After cutting both pieces out, you will use double sided tape to put them together.

I created two different sets of the game… and I had to stop myself from making a third!

Here’s a look at some of the finished game pieces…

I hope I’ve inspired you to use your own digital products to create this fun game! If you give this project a try, we would love to see pictures of your completed projects in the Hybrid Gallery at The Digital Press!


TanyaAbout the Author  Tanya is a member of the hybrid creative team here at The Digital Press. She has been paper and hybrid crafting for at least 18 years now, and loves creating and sharing those creations with others. Her all-time favorite tool is her Silhouette Cameo. She has been married for 30 years to her high school sweetheart, Richard, and has two sons: Chris, 28 and Chance, 23. She also enjoys crocheting, photography, and woodworking.

 

Hybrid How-To | Make a Notebook Cover

Hello everyone, and welcome to another edition of our Hybrid How-To series on The Digital Press blog! Today I’m going to teach you how to use digital products to make a physical cover for your Traveler’s Notebooks (and/or for any other small book) by printing and using your favorite papers and digital word art from The Digital Press.

To give you a good idea of what can be created using the digital products you’ll find here at The Digital Press, I’ve selected a wide range of products to play with today. Here is a look at some of the gorgeous products I am using for today’s tutorial…

The Good Life — a TDP Designer collaboration

Blessed | Collection by Karla Noel

Snapshots | Kit by Little Lamm Paper Co.

Wild Child | Papers by Rachel Etrog Designs

A Little Focus | Word Art by KimB Designs

That’s a good selection, right? I love how much variation there is in the different types of products (and styles, too) that you can find when you go digital.

I started doing my memory keeping in a Traveler’s Notebook about a year and half ago. The inserts I use are easy to find at my local craft store, and they are inexpensive. When I went to get covers for the notebooks, however, I was disappointed — both by the lack of selection, and by the high price tags! So I started doing some research and playing around a little bit, and made a few of my own.

Here is a look at some of the tools I used  for this project (most were purchased at my local craft store or on Amazon)…

*A Few Supply Notes* The “fun foam” and Avery self-adhesive laminating sheets are 9″ x 12″ in size; you can also make these using vinyl, a laminating machine, and/or iron-on cloth webbing. The elastic cording is 2mm thick. Double-sided tape, eyelets, and a Crop-a-Dile (or some type of hole/eyelet puncher) are also necessary.

To begin, I printed my papers out on medium weight craft paper; the presentation paper that I normally use to print photos was a bit too heavy for this project, as you want something that will bend easily. I used a 8.5″ x 11″ sheet paper, which was just tall enough for my “standard” size Traveler’s Notebook (the 11″ was actually a little wide, so I ended up cutting about 1/2 inch off the width, once printed).

The next step is to adhere the self-laminating sheet to the printed side of your pattern paper. Smooth gently with your hand as you lay the adhesive laminate over your paper, and go slowly to avoid any bubbles or wrinkles.

Cut off the excess laminating sheet so that it is even with the pattern paper. Now you are ready to add the foam to the other side of your paper. I used double-sided sticky tape for this, adhering it to the piece of foam first, as shown here…

Pay extra attention to the edges and the corners, as shown above, as that is where it could separate if not taped all the way to the end.

Next, remove all of the tape protector and line up the foam piece with your paper and smooth out. Once adhered… you can cut the foam to fit your paper…

You now have your cover — approximately 8.5″ x 11″ (or whatever size you may have used, instead) with the pattern paper side laminated, and the other side adhered to the foam. This is a good time to trim it down if it is too wide, or if you have any uneven edges.

Next, you are going to punch holes for your eyelets. I punched a 1/8 inch hole using my Crop-A-Dile and my Big Bite for the center hole. You can either just measure and mark where you want to punch the holes using a pen, or you can make a paper template to set onto the foam to guide you as to where to punch the holes. I made my two holes about 1/2 inch down from each edge, and then the center hole about 4-1/2 inches down from the top.

After punching the holes you are ready to set your eyelets. This is step can be a bit tricky depending on your eyelets. I had to redo a couple of mine because the eyelet wasn’t long enough to make it thru all of the layers (to fix, I just pulled out the funky eyelet and tried another eyelet from the same pack and it worked great).

Once you set your eyelets, you can also use a corner edger/chomper to round your corners (see next image, below). I rounded mine to 1/4 inch on all four corners. This was a personal preference decision; I think it gives it a more finished look…

Now you are ready to thread your cording thru the eyelets. I cut the main piece of cording to about 20 inches. I started on the inside and left a “tail” of cord to go thru the first hole at the top, and then from the outside I threaded it through the second hole at the top, like this…

Once your cord is threaded through the eyelets, you will tie the two ends together. You’ll want this to be taut — but not so tight that your book curls up on you a lot. If you’re not sure, tie it loosely and put one of your inserts in to see if it feels right. When you are satisfied, tie your knot and trim the ends.

Next, you’ll want to thread the middle cord that actually goes around the book. For this one, I cut about 10 inches of cording. Before threading both ends thru the center hole, you may want to make a “tab” out of the fun foam like I did. I just cut a 3 inch rectangle of foam and rounded the corners, punched a hole on each end, and threaded the cord in and out of the holes.

Then you are ready to take both ends from the outside to the inside of the center eyelet. Because you are pushing thru two cords this one may be tight – on 2 of mine it worked, and on two of them I went ahead and punched a bigger hole and used a bigger eyelet.

Once you get the threads in, you’ll tie a knot — making sure the cord is lose enough to fit over the top and around your notebook.

Here is a look at the finished notebooks without any inserts; they will lay much better once the inserts are placed inside…

Here is a view from the back of the book; it’s sometimes nice to put different paper or word art here…

Next, you can add the inserts. My books get so bulky that I only add two insert books into mine, as you can see here…

Here are a few photos that show my book after I added my completed inserts…

As you can see, they will actually hold quite a bit!

And finally, here’s a look at all of my completed notebooks with their new custom-made covers!

And that’s it! Super cute, and fun to make. I hope I’ve inspired you to use your own digital products to make a book cover! If you give this project a try, we would love to see pictures of your completed projects in the Hybrid Gallery at The Digital Press!

Happy crafting, everyone!


About the Author  KerriAnne is a homebody who resides in the desert SW. She started scrapbooking when her kids were little and hasn’t stopped despite the teenagers rolling their eyes and sticking out their tongues!  When not scrapping or being a chauffeur, she can be found consuming large amounts of iced coffee.

Hybrid How-To | Use of Patterned Papers

Hello everyone, and welcome to another edition of our Hybrid How-To series on The Digital Press blog! Today I am here to show you how to use multiple patterned papers from your favorite digital kit(s) on your next hybrid scrapbook page.

For the purpose of this tutorial, I added my patterned papers onto a Traveler’s Notebook spread. You can see the final result here…

If you are a lover of patterned papers, then this post is a shout out to YOU!

How many times do you find yourself completely in love with more than 1, 2, 3 (or more!) patterned papers in a collection… and wanting to use ALL of them on your layout? Decisions, decisions… right?! Well, let’s dive into how you can please your palate for all of your patterned paper dreams.

For my layout, I decided to use the Monthly Chronicles March 2019 Nurture collection, shown here…

Here’s a better look at the papers that were available for me to choose from, within this collection…

To begin my project, I used my paper trimmer and cut 1” strips of paper, as shown here…

Then, I turned each stack of paper strips 90 degrees and used the trimmer again to cut the strips into 1″ x 1” squares.

The reason I love using small pieces in this way? You’ll find that you can maximize using multiple patterned papers on a layout by using a shape punch (i.e. square, circle, triangle…) to really spread the love to all your chosen patterned papers. You can also use your die cutting machine (i.e. Cricut Explore Air, Silhouette Cameo, Sizzix Big Shot, etc.), or even freehand with scissors to evenly cut out your preferred shapes.

 

Sprinkle Patterned Paper Mini Bits Here and There…

Once I had a sampling of paper pieces to work with, I staggered my patterned papers for a smooth flow in which the overall design is not in a block or predictable square format, if that makes sense (scroll up to my layout example image, above, and you’ll see what I mean). I prefer the eye to flow to different levels throughout the layout for interest and pop.

One important recommendation — I think it’s best to lay out your design FIRST, instead of immediately gluing down your papers with a permanent adhesive. You might want to change around a few squares or so here and there. Once you have permanently glued everything down, you are committed. 🙂

 

Choose a Dominant Patterned Paper as Your “Showcase” Paper…

A dominant paper would be one that has a busier, bolder or stronger pattern than the others you’ve chosen to use on your layout. For example, on my layout, I chose my dominant pattern paper as the fern/leaf paper. It was a bit bolder in color and pattern than my other papers, which were all more toned-down in neutrals or pastels and design flow. If you look at the final project image, up above, you’ll see that the squares of paper with the fern pattern just stand out as a tiny bit bolder/more noticeable.

You’ll want to be careful with your dominant paper so that you don’t use it too often in your layout. I like to design in “odd” numbers for balance and eye flow. So, I cut 7 squares for my dominant paper that would not overpower my other choice of papers.

Mix and Match Your Patterned Paper With Photo(s) and/or Journaling 

I chose a minimal flow for my overall design, and decided to have one photo as the focal point of my layout. Also, I toned down the photo by printing it in black and white for a smoother transition into the multiple patterned papers (as they are various colors within themselves).

If you add a color photo, you want to be careful with your dominant pattern paper choice, as well as the rest of the coordinating papers of choice on your layout. Otherwise, things can end up being too bold and overpower the photo itself.

Finally, you’ll see in this next image that I planned my layout design out ahead, in order to leave a space at the top for my title work in addition to the space for a photo at the bottom left…

Here’s one more look at the finished project…

Hopefully these ideas will be helpful the next time you consider printing out a few of your favorite digital papers to add to a physical project!

I challenge you to choose 3-4 of your favorite pattern papers from over in The Digital Press shop on your next layout! We can’t wait to see what you come up with after you try out my tips for inspiration. Load up some projects in the gallery and link us up in the comments, if you do!


About the Author  Wendy has a strong passion for the arts, lots of creative spirit, and is fearless in working with new products and techniques. During the day, she works full-time as an Audit Manager. Wendy and her family live on the Gulf coast of emerald waters in Navarre, Florida. Her husband is from Italy and is an amazing Executive Chef at an Italian restaurant in Navarre. Her daughter is a Yorkie named Principessa. Wendy has over 20 years of experience in the scrapbooking industry. She has been published several times in print and online scrapbook magazines, and has designed for several manufacturer’s creative teams. Wendy is currently designing for The Digital Press as a hybrid artist.   Also, Wendy is on the Creative Teams for Feed Your Craft, Sahin Designs, Everyday Explorers and Creative Memories.