Create a Valentine’s Day Printable

Valentine’s Day Printable

 

I am a hopeless romantic, and just love Valentine’s Day. Today, I am here to show you how to create a simple Valentine’s Day printable using word art and digital elements from The Digital Press. You can print and frame for a piece of artwork… or make a card to send to a loved one.

 

Valentine's Day Printable

Step 1. Gather a collection of Digital Supplies that includes any word art and elements you would like to use. For my printable, I used l’Amore by Little Lamm & Co., Be Mine by Mari Koegelenberg & Danielle Engebretson, and the TDP mini kit Cherished.

Step 2. Create a new 8×10 canvas in your photo-editing program (it should be 300dpi for print-resolution). Place your words on your layout until you have them arranged in the desired position.

Step 3. You can add color to some of the words, or clip digital papers to items you’ve chosen. You can even add drop shadows to a few of your words to add dimension.

Step 4. If desired, add a few digital elements to embellish your word art (you can see that mine uses hearts, arrows, etc.).

Step 5. Print it out onto paper and frame at 8×10 to show off your new lovely artwork.

Valentine’s Day Printable

Step 6. If you would also like to create a greeting card using your printable, simply re-size it to 5×7 and then print, seal with a kiss, and send to your loved one.

Valentine’s Day Printable

 

Cute, isn’t it? And so easy!

Hopefully this tutorial helps you think of ideas for repurposing your digital products and creating your own home printables and cards.

 


LindyKrickbaum

About the Author  Lindy Krickbaum is a member of the creative team at the Digital Press. She is a happily-married wife, and best friend to her twin sister. She currently lives in Johnson City, Tennessee in the United States. Lindy is a self-admitted scrap-a-holic, rarely missing a day to scrap. She also enjoys designing jewelry, reading, and traveling every chance she gets.

 

Renew Your Love (and Motivation) for Long-Term Projects

Renew Your Love (and Motivation) for Long-Term Projects

We scrappers usually love long term projects. They bring this comforting feeling that come with routine and habits, without mentioning the joy of recording those memories… but they can also be challenging at times!

These sorts of projects come in all shapes and forms:

  • Everyday/Photogaphy-Centered Projects: pocket-scrapping (Project Life); Project 365 (P365; one photo a day); Project 52 (P52; one photo a week); Project 12 (P12; one photo a month). For example, here’s a look at my last layout from my P365 project in 2015:

  • Themed Projects: All About Me (AAM; one page a week or month about yourself… with the mandatory selfie, of course!); “letter to my kid(s)” (or any other loved one); a year of _____ (fill in the blank; it could be about a hobby, about your pet, or about anything that you’re passionate about!); monthly resolutions-check up layouts; words of the month throughout the year, etc. This year, for instance, I plan to do such a page every month (in addition to my P365-ish) that contains a look at what happened, how I felt, how I progressed on my goals / resolutions, new things I learned, things that worked or didn’t work, etc. I think this will make for a great album! I haven’t started yet, but I found this gorgeous page by TDP creative team member Sabrina, which I found to be totally inspiring:

  • Technique-Centered Projects: these would be about one technique or scrapping style, like Art Journaling layouts, ATCs, journaling-focused layouts, trying a new technique every month or week, hybrid projects, etc.

If you’re anything like me, you’ve probably started and stopped those projects many times over the years. For instance, you might have started an annual album — but now you have an unfinished pocket-style scrapbook project that is making you feel guilty. Well, first of all, please stop feeling guilty… right now! Even if you only have one page done, it’s one more page than nothing. It is still a documented memory! Put it in your book. And rather than focusing on the memories you “missed,” focus instead on the ones you did record. That is already amazing — and there’s no such thing as “failing” in memory-keeping!

I’ve completed everyday-type projects every year since 2011, and here are some tips that have helped me get through each of them:

  1. Knowing WHY I am doing the projects. When I’m clear about my motivations, it’s easier to keep going even when I am busy, when I lose my scrapping mojo, when I feel like my life is boring and not scrap-worthy. I’ve often scrapped those motivations and/or thoughts about the project, and used those as the first page in my photo book. It’s a fun way to make an intro to the album!
  2. Keeping things simple. The first 2 years, I used a template I created with a spot for the daily photo and some journaling, plus a journaling spot for extra info. That way, the planning and design was all done and I simply had to switch my photos from horizontal to vertical when needed… clip my papers, add a few elements, add my journaling… and I was done. I’ve since switched to pocket scrapping, and I’ve used actions (more on that later) to create personalized templates for each page that fit my photos perfectly. I also simplify things by using one kit or collection for the entire month… and the same fonts throughout the whole project (one for journaling, and one for the dates on my photos, and that’s it!). This not only helps me scrap faster (as I don’t have as many creative decisions to make), but it also brings some unity throughout my whole album when I get it printed.
  3. Trying to scrap regularly. It’s much easier to go through one or two pages at a time, rather than catch up and finish 5 months in a row. If you want to use your “big girl camera,” keep it as easy to grab as you can (just make sure little hands can’t grab it too easily! Gaaaah!). You’re way more likely to use it if it’s right next to you, than if you have to search for it or go grab it from somewhere far from where the action is happening.
  4. Automating things as much as possible. Technology is fantastic… let it help you! I’ve created actions in Photoshop to help me scrap my pages as quickly as possible. I originally started with a commercial use pocket-templates maker, and eventually tweaked it so that it not only creates the photo spots but also the double page spread, the background just like I like it, etc. I have another action to save the JPG and the web versions of both the double-spread and each page individually. Same goes for journaling: I use an app to record my journaling, and I’ve set up reminders every evening. When I forget to do it at night, I go through my social media accounts and my calendar to help me remember what happened (I have the worst memory ever!). I call my smartphone my second brain for a good reason: it’s an amazing tool to help me remember to take a photo, write down a few sentences about what happened that day, even record video (as I explained in a previous post here on the blog). Set up processes to upload your photos regularly, edit and rename them as you upload them, back them up (it goes without saying, right?), etc. Anything that helps you go faster through repetitive tasks is a great help!
  5. Let go of perfection and the guilt that comes with it. There is no such thing as a scrapping police! I used to call my projects “P365-ish” …because I do miss days here and there! If I can, I quickly change the date on my camera (that way the metadata shows the previous date too!) and take a picture for the day(s) I missed. And if I can’t, then so be it! No big deal! I’ve started many P365 projects over the years, taking my daily picture religiously for… 2 months, and I finally switched to a pocket-style project because I stopped taking daily photos. Again, no big deal. I’m getting memories recorded either way, right? I’ve had 2-page spreads with tons of photos for one week (especially for Christmas when a lot is going on), and other times I just have one page with only 2 photos for a 2 week period. I’m fine with it. I usually take photos with my DSLR, but I’m definitely OK with phone photos, too! The most important thing is to enjoy the project, both while doing it and when it’s completed.
  6. Don’t forget to print your pages! This is incredibly rewarding and I love to go through my books from the previous years. I usually wait to create them until there’s a sale because I love a great deal (who doesn’t, right?). Sometimes I buy a credit and use the deadline as a motivation to finish my pages (That’s what I did with my 2014 PL: I finished it in May 2015 since I had a credit for a book that I refused to lose! I’m pretty sure it wouldn’t be printed yet if it weren’t for the credit! LOL)

I hope those tips will help you enjoy one (or many!) long term project in 2016.

If you’re feeling inspired now… please head over to the forum where there’s a challenge to go along with today’s post!

 


Chloé

About the author  Chloé is in charge of PR and communication for her small town by day, and is a digiscrapper “by night” and a photographer whenever the light is beautiful. She lives with her man and fur-babies in a small town of Alsace (in the northeast of France), where she loves to read, watch good TV shows (TWD being her absolute favorite), and just hang out with her friends — no matter if they are close by, online, or away in her Swiss hometown.

Tips for Printing At Home

Tips For Printing At Home
It’s often that people, and scrapbookers specifically, say that they cannot get good prints at home. I’ve been printing at home for a long time with great success, so I always wonder what is causing all this trouble. Today I’m going to be sharing the knowledge I’ve accumulated over the years that helps me achieve great quality prints at home!

Printer Types

Generally speaking there are 2 types of printers. One type is targeted towards offices and businesses. These types of printers are great for printing text and simple graphics such as graphs or clip art, and they tend to focus on speed rather than image quality. They also tend to have fewer single color ink cartridges, or one ink cartridge that contains 3 colors in one unit.

The second type of printer is a photo printer. It is made with photo printing in mind and will do a much better job at making prints because it’s focus is on print quality – not speed. Part of the reason it makes better prints is because it has a specialized print head, and generally speaking will lay down the ink in much finer drops which creates less striping and better gradients. Photo printers also tend to have more ink tanks, and some of the more advanced printers these days will have 8 to 10 separate colors of ink!

Ink

As with most things you can buy brand name or a knock off/generic. This holds true for ink. Each printer manufacturer produces ink that is formulated to work in their printers, and will give you the best prints with no fuss & little to no problems.

However, I’ve recently begun to experiment with generic ink in one of my printers and I’m finding it to not be that bad. Years ago refilling ink cartridges was a messy endeavor; bottles of ink, syringes, and filling up empty cartridges without spills was a pain. Now you can just buy the cartridges all filled and ready to go; I buy mine on Amazon. The manufacturer of your printer doesn’t want you to use generic ink, because that is where they make most of their profits. In recent years they’ve begun installing little micro-chips that let the printer detect one or all of the following: if the cartridge is authentic, if it’s been installed before, and/or the last known level of ink it contained. It’s designed to prevent the use of “unauthorized” ink, but there are workarounds. The downsides to generic ink are that it’s not available for every printer or cartridge number, there’s a greater chance that you may get a defective or non-functioning cartridge, and that the ink may not produce as good a print as manufacturer made ink.

Paper

I suspect the leading cause of “bad prints” is because of the wrong choice in paper. Regular printer/copy paper and cardstock soaks up ink which leads to dull results. Paper that is intended for making photo quality prints has a coating and also comes in various finishes such as glossy, semi-gloss or lustre, and matte. The coating and finishes are what allow you to achieve prints that are vibrant and colorful. Just as with ink, the printer manufacturers make their own paper and you can also get generic paper. Generic photo paper is made without a specific printer in mind and as such will more often that not give you a print with “wonky colors”. Paper that is made by the same manufacturer as the printer has been tested to work and produce good results simply by selecting the type in the printer settings dialog box. So it’s very important to make sure that you are telling your printer what you are using!

There is also a third category. Paper with corresponding printer profiles. What that means is that an independent paper mill has had their paper profiled for different printers which ensures that you get accurrate colors in your prints that match with what you see on screen. One such company that does this is Red River Paper. I am not affiliated with Red River, but am a happy customer so I like to spread the word in regards to their quality product. Check their ICC Profile Page to see if your printer is one that they offer profiles for that works with their paper. They have many helpful resources on that page that will help you install & use their ICC Profiles. One thing to note is that you need to print through software that handles “color management”. The only software that I’m aware of that does this is Photoshop.

I’m often asked what printer I use. Currently I have 2 Canon brand printers. One is the Pixma Pro-100, which is a wide-format photo printer that uses an 8 ink system, and the other is the Pixma MG7120. It’s also a photo printer but it only uses 6 colors of ink and prints standard letter paper width. You may wonder why I have two printers, and that’s a good question! I use Canon brand ink in the wide-format printer and only use that when I need to print photos & hybrid projects larger than letter size paper or I want the absolute best print. The other printer is filled with generic ink (but still makes a very good print) and is used for my family’s everyday printing which includes everything from text documents to coupons to smaller hybrid projects. Epson is another highly regarded printer manufacturer.

Printers are just like any other machine – they only do what you tell them to do. By making wise choices about ink, paper, and settings you too can have prints that you are proud of!

AmberAbout the author: Amber Funk enjoys a vast assortment of interests such as scrapbooking, photography, getting crafty with her Silhouette Cameo, reading, and playing video games. She is a Wife and Mother of 2 living in Northern California and blogs her crafty adventures at http://perfectly-fabulous.com/

How to make a hybrid box card

DonnaEspiritu-LifeCaptured-hybrid

Hi all! Donna here to share with you some tips and tricks that I do when I create hybrid projects.

1. Re-sizing patterns

In traditional or paper crafting, they have sizes like 12×12, 8×8 and 6×6 paper pads. The last two are perfect for card-making. They’re basically shrank 12×12 patterns. Digitally, it’s super easy to replicate.

Here are image comparison when you re-size a paper to 6×6 and 8×8, respectively.

2

1

For this particular pattern, I like the 6×6 version better for the card I have in mind. Below is a sample of how I collage my elements. I re-size them first before printing, of course.

3

Here is the card after the print/cut/paste/assembly process (closed)

DonnaEspiritu-LifeCaptured-hybrid003

And you can watch this video for a short tutorial on how I created this super fun card:

Thanks and hope you liked what I shared today.

Have a great day!

Donna

About the Author: Donna Espiritu is a new mother to a little girl and wife to a very supportive husband. She is currently living in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia with her family. When she is not scrapbooking, she likes to read some sci-fi/romantic/time-travel themed books or watching old episodes of some of her favorite tv shows.

Create Hybrid Journal Cards with Digital Kits

Create Your Own Journal Cards with Digital Kits

 

Sometimes I fall in love with a digital kit and all the fabulous patterned papers and embellishments only to find out the kit doesn’t have any pre-made journal cards for Pocket Scrappers like me. But since becoming friendly with the shape tool and clipping masks in Photoshop, I make my own cards in just a few minutes and can customize to my needs.

Create Your Own Journal Cards with Digital Kits

 

I used Mari Koegelenberg and Scotty Girl Design’s new collection called Party Animals to make this hybrid page about my daughter’s 5th birthday party this past week. It was the perfect collection and perfect timing.

Create Your Own Journal Cards with Digital Kits

I made a video showing my process in creating these hybrid cards. Please let me know if you have any questions or comments. I’d love to hear them.

 

brenda

About the Author: Brenda Smith is a mother of two littles and wife located in Southern California. When she is not scrapbooking, you can find her working full-time, trying to finish up her college degree with online classes, or sleeping because there are never enough hours in the day. Hybrid scrapping satisfies her addiction to technology and her addiction to paper and glue.

 

Best Moments of 2014 Documented Hybrid ABC-Style

 

 

Best Moments of 2014 Documented Hybrid ABC-Style

 

Good morning! Brenda Smith here, sharing with you how I documented the best moments of 2014 in We R Memory Keepers 4×4 album. I documented our entire year with 12×12 pocket pages already, but wanted something more accessible that could be kept out as a coffee table-type album.

The first thing I did was create an A-Z list of moments corresponding with each letter. Some were more of a stretch than others (like Xmas for X), but I eventually filled out my list. Next, I went very basic with the title page. I knew I wanted to use the January Special Edition products for the entire album because the colors were vibrant and happy, so I picked this beautiful floral paper from Sugarplum Paperie.

 

Best Moments of 2014 Documented Hybrid ABC-Style

 

 

 

Next, since this album would obviously require several pages for the entire alphabet, I decided to create a simple yet visually appealing template for each page. I kept one page as a 4×4 protector with layered papers and one big photo and a few different elements and the other side as four 2×2 protectors with two smaller photos and two smaller pieces of paper with labels.

Best Moments of 2014 Documented Hybrid ABC-Style

 

Obviously to work with the opposite sides of the page protectors used, I have to alternate the sides the 4×4 and 2x2s are on. I used some wooden veneer alphabet to denote the letter. I really enjoyed using papers from several different designers, including Crafty Mess papers from Mommyish.

Best Moments of 2014 Documented Hybrid ABC-Style

I kept a 4×8 template in Photoshop for both layouts and simply clipped different papers, pictures, and word art to each new letter. This really sped up the process for me and I was able to finish this entire album in only two nights’ worth of work (which is really fast for me since I can be a slow scrapper). Also, isn’t that camera paper by Laura Passage so fun??

Best Moments of 2014 Documented Hybrid ABC-Style

One of the things I’ve learned with all the mini albums I’ve made is to vary the placement of dimensional embellishments to make the pages lay evenly. In this album, I altered the placement of the wood veneer letters in order to have the pages stack on top of each other evenly.

Best Moments of 2014 Documented Hybrid ABC-Style

I printed out each separate page as one layer on a 4×6 sheet of Canon Matte Photo Paper. I know there are some who prefer to print up each individual element and then layer on top of each other with glue, but I like to save time by shadowing in Photoshop and printing as a single layer.

Best Moments of 2014 Documented Hybrid ABC-Style

 

The January Special Edition products were perfect for an album of this type because I had several papers and embellishments to choose from that already coordinated perfectly. Yet another time-saving element for me because it took the guesswork out of making sure everything matched perfectly.

Best Moments of 2014 Documented Hybrid ABC-Style

One of the best things about this album (besides the small amount of time it took me to make) has been that it’s small enough for my kids to look through. They have both picked it up several times and reminisced over all the fun things we did last year. It makes my heart happy to see them remembering things so fondly.

I won’t bombard you with more pictures of this album as I’m sure you get the idea but will be posting them all in the gallery at some point. I hope I’ve encouraged you to try a similar style album and have given you a few ideas of how it can be done quickly.

 

brenda

About the Author: Brenda Smith is a mother of two littles and wife located in Southern California. When she is not scrapbooking, you can find her working full-time, trying to finish up her college degree with online classes, or sleeping because there are never enough hours in the day. Hybrid scrapping satisfies her addiction to technology and her addiction to paper and glue.