Tutorial Tuesday | Capture the Everyday

I’ve been following a few photography challenges this year, and even if I don’t do them every week (or at all, let’s be honest!), they are slowly influencing me and helping me see my daily world with new, creative eyes. A few days ago I was doing our laundry and decided to capture this everyday, mundane task as artistically as possible, and in as many different ways as I could think of. And it was so, SO fun!
Capture the Everyday

Of course, some of my images didn’t turn out… but that’s OK because experimenting was part of the fun. I decided to implement various photography techniques — like macro, changing angles and perspectives, long exposures, purposeful blurs, compositional “rules” like leading lines, centered compositions, repetition/pattern, texture, rule of thirds, etc.

Capture the Everyday

This was truly an eye-opening experience and I never thought photographing something as mundane as the laundry would be so fun and could bring so much variety in the images.

Capture the Everyday

To add some cohesiveness to the photos I took, I edited them all with The Basics Lightroom Presets (#1) by Dunia Designs.

If you, too, want to see — and document — your everyday life with new eyes, why not try something similar?

  • Grab your camera and focus (pun intended!) on some daily aspect of your life — a task (like my laundry), an object, a place, etc. You don’t need much time to do this; 5-10 minutes is plenty to do this sort of creative exercise
  • Try to look at your everyday event like an explorer would when discovering a new civilization. Forget everything you know about this thing and try to see it with fresh eyes, as if it were the first time you laid your eyes on it
  • Then… simply grab your camera and start playing! Change your angles, take a wide shot to capture the whole environment (or the opposite — come closer and do a close-up shot), play with light and shadows, experiment with the composition rules and have fun. Maybe you won’t produce a masterpiece but you will definitely start seeing your world with new eyes!

I hope you’ll have fun experimenting and being creative, and I’d LOVE to see the result if you try your hand (and eye) at it! You can leave links to photos in the comments, below… or if your photos actually result in the creation of a scrapbook layout, you can post it in TDP’s gallery and then link me up here!

 


ChloéAbout the author  Chloé is in charge of PR and communication for her small town by day, is a digiscrapper “by night,” and a photographer whenever the light is beautiful. She lives with her man and fur-babies in a small town of Alsace (in the northeast of France), where she loves to read, watch good TV shows (TWD being her absolute favorite), and just hang out with her friends — no matter if they are close by, online, or away in her Swiss hometown. She recently became quite obsessed with her BuJo (bullet journal) and can’t wait to discover how much it’ll help her improve her (so far non-existent!) organisational skills!

Tutorial Tuesday | Intentional Blur in photography

Tutorial Tuesday | Intentional Blur in Photography

In many cases, blurry photos are a bad thing: photos are supposed to be in focus and sharp to be considered good. I usually follow this “rule” but I’ve been trying to be more creative recently and I’ve decided to create intentional blur in my photos. And I found out that the result could be awesome, fun, and creative (as is often the case when you break an artistic “rule” on purpose!).

Let’s discover the 3 types of blur you can have in photography (all images are retouched with Dunia Designs‘s The Basics Lightroom Presets):

Camera shake: when your shutter speed is too slow to handheld your camera, you get camera shake. It can be “bad” when it’s distracting from the subject of your picture, but it can also be a fun technique when done on purpose. I took this very abstract image, for example, with a 3 seconds exposure and while spinning my camera in front of Christmas lights.

Tutorial Tuesday | Intentional Blur in Photography

Cynthia Haynes is a photographer I discovered recently who is known for her long exposure / intentionally blurry pictures, and she has some pretty inspiring shots!

Bokeh: this type of blur is created by using a very big aperture (very small f/number, like f/1.8 for example) and it’s usually in the backgound of something sharp, but you can also create bokeh “by itself”, on purpose. Last week we had some spectacular sunsets, and I obviously had to snap some pix after work. I started with the classic, in focus, shot.

Tutorial Tuesday | Intentional Blur in Photography

Not bad, but not very original either, right? Then I decided to manually un-focus and create bokeh with the sun reflection on the river. You can’t see the landscape any more, but you get an abstract picture where light and colors are the most important things.

Tutorial Tuesday | Intentional Blur in Photography

Here’s a more classic example of bokeh, that I created by focusing on the puddle right in front of me with a very big aperture, so that the background (and a bit of the foreground too, since the depth of field is very small) is out of focus.

Tutorial Tuesday | Intentional Blur in Photography

Movement blur: this happens when your camera is steady (because your shutter speed is fast enough for you to handheld it or because it’s on a strong support like a tripod, a table, etc.) but that your subject moves faster than your shutter speed. This is the technique you use to photograph fireworks, for example, that’s how you create those gorgeous “flowers”.

Tutorial Tuesday | Intentional Blur in Photography

You can also use this technique to show movement and gives a sense of speed. That’s what I did (without even knowing, I was just starting to take pictures and had absolutely no idea what I was doing! LOL) while photographing the Tour de France in our little town in 2005. I got on the first floor of a building, right above the road, and since the day was cloudy and dark, my camera (in auto mode) selected a shutter speed too slow for those speedy athletes.

Tutorial Tuesday | Intentional Blur in Photography

If I had do take that picture again, knowing what I know now, I’d definitely try to use a technique called panning where you follow your moving subject with the camera. That way, your subject will look sharp and the environment around it will become blurry, kinda the opposite of the image above.  It’s a perfect technique for races of all sorts because of how much it materializes speed.

I hope you’ll enjoy playing with intentional blur and find these tips helpful! Don’t hesitate to comment with your questions or post in the forums!


Chloé

About the author  Chloé is in charge of PR and communication for her small town by day, is a digiscrapper “by night” and a photographer whenever the light is beautiful. She lives with her man and fur-babies in a small town of Alsace (in the northeast of France), where she loves to read, watch good TV shows (TWD being her absolute favorite), and just hang out with her friends — no matter if they are close by, online, or away in her Swiss hometown

Moving Forward into Fall

Moving Forward Into Fall

 

I don’t know about you, but I am so ready to move forward into Fall. Fall is by far my favorite season. There is just something about fall that brings a peaceful feeling. I don’t know if it’s the change in weather or the beautiful warm colors, but I just can’t wait for that  first crisp breeze that lets you know summer is gone and fall is in the air.

As fall officially begins this month, I’d thought I’d share a few of the things I look forward to. Here are some of my Fall Favorites:

  • The Crisp, Fresh Air
  • The Beautiful, Warm Colors
  • Leaf Lookin’ (as we call it in the South)
  • Football Season
  • Sweaters & Tall Boots
  • Pumpkin Lattes (or anything pumpkin flavored)
  • Snuggling Up with a Warm Blanket and a Good Book
  • Halloween
  • Corn Mazes
  • Hot Apple Cider
  • Making Soups
  • Pumpkin Patches
  • Leaves Crunching Under Your Feet
  • Fall Festivals
  • Fall Spices – Cinnamon, Nutmeg, Cloves

 

I used Little Lamm & Co.’s Crisp Collection to document some of my fall favorites.

Move Forward Into Fall

 

Move Forward Into Fall

 

So, how about you? What are your fall favorites?

I’m hosting a challenge over on the forums at The Digital Press so grab a Pumpkin Latte and come play along! Check it out at The Drawing Board: Challenges. See you there!

 


LindyKrickbaum

About the Author: Lindy Krickbaum is a Creative Team Member here at the Digital Press. She is a happily married wife and best friend to her twin sister. She currently lives in Johnson City, TN.  Lindy is a self-admitted scrapaholic, rarely missing a day to scrap. She also enjoys designing jewelry, reading and traveling every chance she gets.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Get Your Photos Off Your Camera

Get Photos Off Camera

 

 

 

 

A few months ago, I wrote a post about taking pictures to help you document your everyday. This month, I’d like to discuss getting those photos off your cameras and phones and onto your computers in an organized way so they can be scrapped in a timely manner. I have found that automating this process as much as possible has helped me keep my camera’s SD card as well as my Camera Roll on my phone clean so that I never run out of space on either. Here is my process:

 

Phone Photos

Like most of you, I use my phone to take a lot of photos. I use an app called Carousel by Dropbox to organize and back up my phone photos. When you take a picture, it automatically backs it up to Dropbox if you have that option set up. I have mine set to back it up when I am connected to WiFi so that it doesn’t use my cellular data. Therefore, when I am home, I just open up my Carousel app and it automatically starts backing up any photos on my camera roll.

 

 

Get Photos Off Camera 2

The beauty of Carousel is that it will also alert you when your storage is low on your device. This way, you will never get a message telling you can’t take another photo because you have too many old ones stored on your phone. I don’t typically wait that long. When I think of it, I tap the ellipses at the bottom of the app, go to settings and select Free Up iPhone Space. Then, Carousel will tell me how much space it can free up by removing my photos that are safely stored in Dropbox from my Camera Roll:

 

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Wait. It gets better. Dropbox can get expensive so I don’t use it to store backups of all my photos. So, I need to get my photos out of my Dropbox folder and onto my computer. Enter Lightroom.

 

Lightroom works with Carousel by way of its Auto Import feature. Anytime a photo is uploaded to a watched folder, Lightroom will automatically import it into its catalog whenever Lightroom is launched and it will move it wherever you tell it. It’s pretty easy to set up. First, you need to enable Auto Import:

 

Choose File > Auto Import > Enable Auto Import

 

Next, you need to specify the settings:

 

Choose File > Auto Import > Auto Import Settings

 

In the Auto Import Settings, you will specify the name of the Watched Folder. This folder must not contain any subfolders. In the case of Carousel, the Watched Folder would be the Camera Uploads folder within your Dropbox folder. Next, specify the Destination where you want the photos moved. I move mine to a folder on my hard drive called Auto Imported Photos. Next, you can choose a File Naming option which will rename all of your imported photos. (I don’t do this.) And finally, in the Information section, you can choose to apply Develop Settings, add Metadata and/or Keywords. I apply the Auto Tone develop setting upon import which applies automatic corrections for Exposure, Blacks, Brightness, and Contrast:

 

Auto Import Settings

 

While a lot of what I said may sound overwhelming, let me stress that that is a one time set up. To be clear, my process for uploading my phone photos to Lightroom with color corrections is as follows:

 

Open Carousel.

 

That’s it. All I have to do is open the Carousel app and everything else is automatic!

 

Now, onto my process for downloading my dSLR photos. Unfortunately, my process for that is not as easy, but it can be.

 

dSLR Photos

I choose to tether my camera to my computer to download photos. My reason is this:  I feel there is less probability for damaging or losing my SD card if I don’t take it out of my camera. I keep my camera and cord by my laptop, so it is not really a big deal. I just connect the wire, connect my EHD (because that is where I store my photos), open Lightroom and press the Import button.

 

Along the right hand side, a number of panels open up: File Handling, File Renaming, Apply During Import and Destination.

 

Under File Handling, I check the box “Don’t Import Suspected Duplicates.”

 

File Handling

 

I don’t do anything under Rename my files, however, this is where you could choose to rename all your files by date or event name. I just don’t do that.

 

Under Apply During Import, I choose the Develop Setting Auto Tone which can be found under the Lightroom General Presets. As I stated earlier, this automatically corrects the Exposure, Blacks,  Brightness, and Contrast.

 

Develop Settings

 

Finally, under Destination, I choose to organize them By Date using the Year/Month format. Then, I select my External Hard Drive and navigate to my Pictures folder. There Lightroom will automatically copy my photos from my camera to my EHD and store them in a yearly folder which is then separated again by month.

 

Destination

 

Once my photos are in Lightroom, there are a number of ways they can be organized to make scrapping them a breeze. I will talk about this in another blog post. However, I did want to share with you how some others on our team get their photos off their computer.

 

Sabrina says: I use an app called PhotoSync and it transfers the photos wirelessly. I also have downloaded the application my computer so it can do the transfer. Super easy!! You can get it for iPhone or Android.

 

Jamie says: If you’re working with everything Apple (Mac and iPhone), Airdrop is a great feature to get pictures from your phone (or anyone else also on an iPhone) to your computer. That’s what I usually use to get pics from my phone to computer, then I import them into Lightroom at that point. When getting them off my DSLR, I just put the SD card in my computer, and import through LR. (Note: If you are working with an older Mac computer or iPhone, Airdrop may not be compatible.)

 

Juliette says: My compact camera automatically files my photos by date on my Mac (over wifi from anywhere in the world provided the Mac is turned on) when I press a button on the camera. It’s a Samsung WB800F; it’s absolutely brilliant!

 

Kathryn says: I use Google Photos auto sync to back up my phone photos. It’s a really easy process for Android users as it’s built in and the backup is free. I do also have an Eyefi SD card to do wireless transfer from my dSLR.

 

So, as you can see, there are a number of ways to get your photos off your camera pretty easily, so they are ready and waiting for you to scrap them. So, how about you, what’s your process?

 

 

Jen Flaherty

About the Author: Jen is a member of the Pocket Team at The Digital Press. Having scrapped digitally for many years, she has come to embrace the simplicity of Pocket Scrapping since it fits more easily into her busy lifestyle of shuttling her three children from field to field. When she is not on the computer, you will find her working out or really doing anything else she can besides cooking, cleaning and doing laundry.

Taking Photos of Your Hybrid Projects

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As a hybrid and paper scrapper, one of the questions I am asked most often is how I take pictures of my projects. It has taken me a good portion of my scrapping life to finally get the process streamlined and to a point that I am happy with it. To save you all the lengthy process of trial and error, I have a few tips that might help you. Today, my layout I’m working with is made using Little Lamm and Co.’s It’s My Party

Natural Light

Obviously, natural light will be your greatest ally when photographing your projects. You do not want direct sunlight because of the harsh tones and glare, but if you are able to find a place within your home with the most natural, indirect sunlight, you’ll be well on your way to good photos. I recently moved from my dungeon-dark old house to a house bursting with natural light (at least by contrast), so photographing my projects has become infinitely easier. In the library/computer room, I have set a chair just underneath the window for taking my photos.

 

Taking Photos of Your Hybrid Projects

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

White Foam-Core Board

One of my secret weapons is a white foam-core board like you can find in the school presentation section at craft stores and office supply stores. They cost approximately $3 and last as long as you can keep them white. I place the board on top of the chair and then lay my project on top. I find that this allows the natural light to reflect off of the crisp white board without any weird color casts. Plus, if I need to adjust the temperature of the photo in post-processing, I have a true white neutral I can select for automatic temperature correction.

 

Taking Photos of Your Hybrid Projects

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On occasion, I use an additional white board on the opposite side of my light source. So for me, it goes window, white board laying down with project on top, white board standing up against the edge of the bottom white board, and then me as the photographer. If I find I am not getting enough light on my project, I use the standing white board to bounce the light back on to my project.

Page Protectors

If I am photographing a pocket page, I take my cards out of the page protectors and lay them directly on top. This way, I still get the look and feel of the page protectors themselves without any of the glare of the plastic sleeves.

Taking Photos of Your Hybrid Projects

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Camera

I do not use my DSLR for taking photos and this is probably mostly due to laziness, but also because I have found that my iPhone 6 Plus camera works perfectly. When photographing 12×12 layouts or pocket pages, I set my iPhone to the square setting. If the coloring still seems a little dark, tap on the screen until the sun icon pops up. Then slide your finger up while this icon is on the screen to bump up the brightness. Conversely, you can swipe your finger down if you want it to be darker.

Position

When photographing my projects, I try to stand directly above the project with my camera. I try to make the camera completely parallel with the project so there are no weird angles or distortion with the photo. I usually end up taking about 5-10 photos just to make sure I get one that will work. Then I’ll take a few closeups if I’ll be doing a blog post. I typically keep the camera on the square setting when taking closeups, but that is just personal preference.

Processing

I have used both my computer and my phone for post-processing the photos. On my iPhone, I use the app PicTapGo. My go-to filters for project photos are Brightside (increases brightness), Auto Color, Crispity (sharpness), Cool it Down (I use only if I deem the photo to have too much of a yellow overtone), and Sweet Tooth or Sugar Rush (depending on the colors of my project) to increase the saturation. The fun thing about PicTapGo is that all of these filters are on a sliding scale. I hardly ever use any filter at its full strength, so it’s just a matter of playing around with the levels until you find what looks best. However, once you discover a combination of all these filters that works best for your lighting situation, you can save the recipe within the app and apply it to all future photos with the click of a button. For computer processing, I use the RadLab add on for Photoshop (it’s also compatible with PSE). RadLab is made by the same people who make PicTapGo so my method is very much the same. I bump up the brightness, decrease the warmth, and increase the sharpness, contrast, and saturation.

Ottlite

I mentioned before that my previous house had next to no natural light. Additionally, I am usually a late-night, last-minute type of scrapper so sometimes my photos have to be taken when there’s no natural light. Typical lightbulbs have a very yellow color cast and even with post-processing, I cannot make my photos look right. I discovered Ottlite, which is a brand of light bulbs and lamps that is supposed to be the closest to natural light you can get from an artificial light source. I have a desktop Ottlite Lamp that I scrap with and have attempted to use for the purpose of nighttime photos, but it is not quite bright enough. Ott lamps themselves can be quite costly, even with the use of a coupon but they also offer light bulbs that you can use with your own light fixtures. I went to my local big box craft store and bought three Ottlite bulbs for my ceiling fan. I waited for a sale and got all three bulbs for under $25.

Taking Photos of Your Hybrid Projects

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As you can see, the Ott bulbs  give off much less yellow light compared to a traditional bulb. My husband jokes that it looks like an operating room when these bulbs are in use, but I find it provides the right color and brightness of light needed for my photos.

Here is a photo of my layout taken under regular light and without using any of the tips mentioned above:

Taking Photos of Your Hybrid Projects

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And here is the photo of the same layout following all the tips shared above:

Taking Photos of Your Hybrid Projects

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I am by no means a professional photographer but this is the process that works for me. If you have any tips to add, please share in the comments. I would love to hear your tried and true methods.

 

Brenda

About the Author: Brenda Smith is a mother of two littles and wife located in Southern California. When she is not scrapbooking, you can find her working full-time, trying to finish up her college degree with online classes, or sleeping because there are never enough hours in the day. Hybrid scrapping satisfies her addiction to technology and her addiction to paper and glue.

Overcoming Obstacles to Project Life: Taking Photos and Journaling

OOPL_Photos

 

“I want to do (or continue with) Project Life®  but…”

 

If you’ve ever said either of these phrases to yourself, then this series is for you. (And don’t tell anyone, but this series is for me too!)

 

Project Life® or the more generic, Pocket Scrapping, is a way of scrapbooking that is supposed to simplify the process of documenting the everyday moments that make up your beautifully imperfect, perfect life. However, so many people feel it is too difficult to start or maintain. Huh?! That is the antithesis of why it was created! So, when I was thinking of what to write about, I asked myself how I can help others overcome their hurdles to starting or sticking with Pocket Scrapping. And this series was born. So let’s start from the beginning.

 

In order to document the everyday, one of two things must happen first: you must take photos of your everyday life and/or, you must journal about your everyday life. Ideally, you would do both. To some that is a lot of work. And to most there doesn’t seem to be enough excitement to warrant documentation. And that’s ok! It’s not about documenting an exciting life. It’s about documenting YOUR life. And believe me, to your family, that is exciting enough!

 

So, I’d like to offer a few of the more popular methods for taking photos and journaling everyday.

 

The No Frills Way

The best camera is the one you have with you. You’ve heard it said over and over again. And it really is true. And let’s face it, today’s phone cameras really are pretty good. So if your phone is the only camera you have, go ahead and snap some photos with it. Then do yourself a favor and delete some of them. My iPhone 6+ has an incredible burst feature, but do I really need 20 identical pictures of my daughter picking a flower? Take the photos, view them and then delete them. Right away. And if you can’t get to it right away, do it while you are waiting to pick your child up from school, while in the checkout lane at the supermarket or while at the doctor. Find your down time and use it.

 

Of course, you can also use your big girl (boy) camera — your dSLR. Same rules apply. Take at least one photo every day and delete your duplicates. If you don’t do this in camera, I will be talking about doing this using your computer next month when we talk about getting your photos off your phone and camera and onto the computer.

 

Once you take a photo, you may want to jot a note about it. Unfortunately, the iPhone does not allow for this without the use of a third party app. After much research, I finally found one called Photogene 4 which allows you to very easily modify the IPTC data on your iPhone’s photo. The IPTC data is where you can add a caption to your photo. So even if you never scrap the photo, the story is always attached to it. (Bonus: Photogene 4 is also a pretty good photo editor as well.)

 

Once you open a photo to use in Photogene 4, in order to edit the IPTC metadata, you need to click on the second icon to the right of the wrench.

 

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Then you can click on the tab that says, IPTC.

 

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And then you can type in your photo’s story.

 

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Now, onto journaling. A really basic way to journal using your phone is to use the native calendar that comes with it. On my phone, I can just add a calendar entry titled, “Today,” set the time to “All Day,” and under the Notes section, type in any interesting thoughts about the day. I don’t have to type in what I did, because it’s all in the calendar already. You can also do the same on your desktop calendar if you prefer. While this method does not tell the story of individual photos, it does allow you paint an overall picture of the day or tell the stories that don’t have photos to go with them.

 

The App Way

Yes. There is an app for that. There is an app for everything. Two of the best apps (imho) for combining photos and stories on an iPhone are Day One and Collect.

 

Day One is an iPhone and desktop app that will prompt you on both of your devices to journal about your day at a time specified by you. I have mine set to the end of the day so that if when it alerts me, I haven’t yet taken a photo, I can quickly take one to represent the day. When you open the app, you are met with two large icons: a camera and a plus sign.

 

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Clicking the camera gives you the option to use the last photo taken, take a photo or choose from your photo library.

 

OOPL: Taking Photos

 

Once you choose or take a photo, you will be prompted to journal about it. And that photo and journal entry will be added to that day.

 

Collect is also an iPhone app. Again, it is super easy to use. Once you open it, the home screen looks like a calendar. When you select the date, a menu pops up asking you whether you want to access your photo library, dropbox, or take a photo.

 

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Once you add a photo to the date, you are given the option to add notes to it.

 

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And finally, for iPhone and Android users, another app that works similarly is Diario, which is also available on your PC and Mac Desktop. (Although I have never tried it personally.)

 

Photo A Day

Perhaps the hardest hurdle to overcome is figuring out what to take photos of. Some days are easy and others are more difficult and this is where the beauty of documenting your everyday life comes in. It’s finding interest in the mundane. I get my inspiration from other Pocket Scrapbookers. I find looking at their pages and following their blogs very helpful. In addition, there are a lot of Photo A Day prompts out there. Some of my favorites are:

 

 

And that leads me to my purpose for this blog series. I’d like all of us at The Digital Press who are working on  documenting our everyday lives to support each other. Let’s share with each other what and how we are documenting our every day, every day. We have started a thread in our forum, which you can find here, to do just that. Let’s help each other tell our stories. Let’s give each other the push we need to take a photo every day (or almost every day) and let’s tell a story every day. Each day, check into the forum and tell us what you took a photo of and what story you told. If you want to share the actual photo, that’s even better, but you don’t have to. But please do stop in and support your fellow scrappers by sharing your strategies for success.

 

And be sure to stop by next month when I share how to get your photos off your camera and onto your computer.

 

Jen FlahertyJen is a member of the Pocket Team at The Digital Press. Having scrapped digitally for many years, she has come to embrace the simplicity of Pocket Scrapping since it fits more easily into her busy lifestyle of shuttling her three children from field to field. When she is not on the computer, you will find her working out or really doing anything else she can besides cooking, cleaning and doing laundry.

Listen with Your Eyes

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When I take my camera out and about, I always start out with the best intentions. I always plan to take my time and focus, pay attention to lighting or the rule of thirds or whatever, trying to get the best picture possible. But I have a weird confession to make. For some reason, I am totally self-conscious when I’m out in public taking photos. Even starting with the best intentions, I find myself rushing as fast as I can and taking quick pictures without spending time on getting the shot I really want. Sometimes I barely even take time to focus the camera. Isn’t that crazy? I know. It totally doesn’t make any sense at all. But unfortunately that is how I roll. Hahaha. Please tell me I am not the only one who feels like this? Actually I hope I am. I really hope that no one else has this quirk in their photographer persona.

I am always impressed by photos that make you feel like you are part of the scene. Photos so rich with story that you can imagine the smells, the sounds, the energy in the air surrounding them. I really believe that to capture shots like those, you have to know what you are looking for. You have to listen with your eyes. You have to take your time and find the moment. The moment that captures the feeling.

In this photo, the focus is on the sparkler and hands in the foreground. The woman is out-of-focus, but definitely still important… right down to the comfortable baggy sweater. But your eyes tell you to focus on the magic the sparks of light offered as well as the cupping of her hands around the base. You can almost hear the little pops and hisses as it burns.

Listen with Your Eyes

by Morgan Sessions

 

In this photo, the moment is captured as the wave slams into the rock, splashing into the air. You can definitely hear this with your eyes. You can also see the wetness of the rock and it is almost tangible to know how it feels to be standing there, taking the picture.

Listen with Your Eyes

by Justin Leibow

 

Here is a photo that also provides a very auditory experience through the visual. You can hear squawking of the gulls, the flapping of wings, and even the gentle lapping of the water onto the shore. You might even imagine a foghorn or a ship’s motor in the distance. There is a lot going on here.

Listen with Your Eyes

by Patryk Sobczak

 

And finally, this photo gives us a glimpse into another sort of story all together. Looking at the picture, you might be able to hear the clatter of silverware against plates, hushed conversations, a waitress taking an order, or the sounds of the cash register totaling someone’s bill. There is a lot of story here, from the worn wood of the table, the metal mugs, the toothpick holder and all of the other soft details. What do you hear?

Listen with Your Eyes

by Andre Freitas

 

Pictures like these make me want to overcome my inhibitions so I can step out and find some confidence behind my camera. I want to seize upon the small, visceral details that help to tell a story. I want to capture rich specifics in a scene. I want to take pictures that cause people to lean in and listen with their eyes.

Now I want you to head on over to the Challenge Forum and discover your mission.

 

Kimberlee

About the Author: Kimberlee is a lover not a fighter; a stay-at-home gran, a poet, and a lifelong learner. She grooves on saturated colors, Tuesday dance parties, optimism, glitter and sunshine. She colors outside the lines.  She is a dreamer. She is a collector of moments.  She is all about the story.  Kimberlee completed her MFA in Creative Writing and is currently working toward a M.Ed. in Instructional Design.