Tutorial Tuesday | Documenting ‘Then and Now’

Hello everyone, and welcome to another edition of our Tutorial Tuesday series here on The Digital Press blog! Today we are going to talk about scrapbooking ‘Then and Now’ pages. I have used this technique many times in the past… but was recently prompted to think about it again when my teenage step-daughter posted a stunning selfie on Instagram. I just stared at this beautiful young lady, and I couldn’t stop thinking about the cute little girl that walked into my life ten years ago. In that moment, I knew I had to create a layout comparing and contrasting the past and present.

There are several approaches to creating a ‘Then and Now’-themed layout, but I want to start with a few tips…

  1. Make Your Comparison Clear — When creating a layout that compares and contrasts, it’s important that the viewer clearly understands what is being compared.  For example, scrapping your photos at a distinctly different size can immediately convey that there is a comparison being made.  If you would rather keep the photos the same size, it helps to make sure the subject in the frame is also the same size.  You could use one black and white photo, and one colored.  Finally, you can clearly split your layout into two distinct sections to show the comparison.
  2. Embrace Your Photos — When using a technique such as this, you may hesitate to use older photos that may not be the best quality. Use them! The quality doesn’t matter as much as the connection you are making, and the memory you are documenting.
  3. Be Open-Minded About the Scope — The photos you are using do not have to be years apart. It could be that the photos are only weeks apart (or even yesterday/today — think: kids getting braces off their teeth, etc.)… but as long as the story is clear, the comparison can be easily made.

To begin giving you some examples and eye candy… we’ll begin with one of The Digital Press’s talented creative team members, Carrie, who created this lovely layout that clearly conveys the comparison of two people in the same spot, many years apart.  She did this by using a colored photo and a black and white photo… keeping the subjects the same size… and using journaling to tell her story. Take a look…

[ credits: Wanderlust Collection by Little Lamm Paper Co. and Then and Now | Photo Masks by Anita Designs ]

This next layout, created by TDP creative team member Chloe, uses both photos and journaling to show the connection between her ‘Then and Now’ comparison. This is a beautiful layout that clearly shows the journey that she has been on. In this instance, the journaling tells her story, and the photos show the time gap…

[ credits: Fresh Starts Papers and Elements by k. becca and Straight Up Alpha by Dawn by Design ]

Finally, here’s a look at my own layout — based on the comparison and memory I described up above, about my step-daughter Avery and a look at her present-day self as compared to the little girl I first met a decade ago…

[ credits: Quick Scraps Vol. 09 Templates and Shine by Anita Designs ]

Now that you’ve seen a few visual examples and have (hopefully!) been inspired to create a page like this of your own… I wanted to share a few ideas about approaches you can take when documenting these types of comparison memories.

Focus on current changes — This approach would be used when comparing, for example, the first day and last day of a school year.  It’s best used when there hasn’t been a lot of time that has passed between photos.  It’s contrasting your child, loved one, or pet when there hasn’t been significant physical changes, but there has been maturing or changes that are unseen.  You would definitely want journaling on your layout to tell the story, because in this approach, it’s often not as evident in the photos.

Focus on similarities or differences — This is a really fun approach, and to explain what I mean, I’m going to use an example.  I would use this approach if I wanted to compare and contrast a photo of myself at the age of seventeen, to a photo of my child at the same age.  Your journaling could talk about your likes and dislikes, or similarities and differences.  You could have a lot of fun with this by displaying the differences in your music playlists, favorite foods, hobbies, and I could go on and on…

Focus on the journey — This approach is probably the most commonly used.  I adapted this approach when creating this layout of Avery.  There are many years between the photos, and it’s quite evident that I’m comparing the two.  You can use journaling in this approach, but you could also forego the journaling, and just have the photos and a title.  It’s all about the journey between the photos in this approach.

 

My hope is, after learning about the schools of thought surrounding this type of layout, and seeing it in action, you are inspired to try it out. It’s truly fun, and the possibilities are endless when it comes to topics. Start with surveying your photos… and I bet you will find a myriad of photos that are rich with possible connections between yesterday and today!


HeidiAbout the Author  Heidi Nicole is happily married to an amazing man, a step mama to 2 wonderful kiddos, and mama to 3 sweet and sassy furbabies. She’s a radiation therapist by day, and creator of pretty things by night (she’s pretty confident that she’s hit superhero status, but refuses to wear a cape). She loves cats and huskies, coffee, audio books, “Friends” reruns, St. Louis Blues hockey, cooking, baking, and traveling. Oh, and wine… she really likes wine. She lives a normal and happy life, and enjoys all the absolutely extraordinary people she gets to share it with on a daily basis!

Foodie Friday | Jimbo Jambo Designs

Hi everyone! It’s Friday, and as always that means it’s time for another edition of our Foodie Friday series here on The Digital Press blog! This week, we’re featuring Aga of Jimbo Jambo Designs. This amazing designer has already been featured twice (if you want to learn even more about her, you can find her first feature article from October 2016 HERE, and her second feature article from May 2017 HERE).

In addition to creating super fun and inspiring templates, she has many other talents as well… including cooking! Let’s discover the three fabulous recipes she will be sharing with us today…

What are those yummy things you see, above?

  1. Chicken in Garlic and Orange Juice
  2. Gazpacho Andaluz
  3. Strawberry Crumble Cake

Chicken in Garlic and Orange Juice

INGREDIENTS

  • 4-6 pieces of chicken
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/3 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/2 cup orange juice
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon curcuma
  • 2  clove of garlic
  • a bit of rosemary and cayenne (pepper) if you like spicy food.

INSTRUCTIONS

  • Season chicken with oregano, salt and pepper, to taste; set aside.
  • Melt butter in a large oven-proof skillet over medium high heat. Add chicken, sear both sides until golden brown, about 2-3 minutes per side; set aside.
  • Mix all ingredients and heat up without boiling and leave to cool.
  • Add chicken and toss to coat. Cover and marinate at least 3 hours up to overnight in the refrigerator.
  • Place into oven and roast until completely cooked through, reaching an internal temperature of 180 degrees C, about 25-30 minutes.

Gazpacho Andaluz

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 kilo of ripe tomatoes (with an accentuated red color)
  • 1 green pepper Italian type (about 60 grams)
  • 1 piece of cucumber (about four fingers wide)
  • 1 piece of onion (about 100 grams)
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons of white wine vinegar
  • 1 small spoonful of salt
  • Optional: 1/2 green apple (for example a Golden) and cold water

INSTRUCTIONS

  • Wash tomatoes, apple, cucumber and pepper well. Let it drain. If you want you can remove the tomatoes’ skin.
  • Remove the corner and seeds from the pepper, cut it into four or five pieces and put it with the tomatoes.
  • Peel the clove of garlic and put it with the rest of the vegetables.
  • Take the piece of onion (peeled) and cut it into three or four pieces. Add to the blender jar.
  • Take a piece of cucumber about four fingers long and peel it. Cut it into four or five pieces and to the blender.
  • Now that all the vegetables of the gazpacho are in the glass of the blender we will turn it on (well covered) and we will leave it working until there is no piece of vegetable left (the time will depend on the power of the blender).
  • Now add the salt, the oil, and the vinegar. I advise you to start with three tablespoons of vinegar and to rectify (adding more) to your liking. Give the blender five seconds and try. Rectifies of salt and vinegar to taste.
  • makes 4 glasses (1 liter)

Strawberry Crumble Cake

INGREDIENTS FOR CRUST

  • 200 g of wheat flour or spelled or oat flour
  • 50 g of rice or potato flour
  • 1 teaspoon of baking powder
  • 150 g butter (cold)
  • 50 g sugar
  • 1 egg

INGREDIENTS FOR CRUMBLE

  • 150 g of wheat flour
  • 50 g of rice or potato flour
  • 50 g sugar
  • 125 g butter (cold)

INGREDIENTS FOR FILLING

  • 800 g strawberries
  • 3 tablespoons of potato flour
  • powdered sugar

INSTRUCTIONS

  • Put baking paper in a form of a size 24 x 34 cm.
  • Put into the bowl both flours, add baking powder, sugar, cut into pieces butter and an egg. Rub your fingers with the rest of the ingredients into a small crumble, then quickly knead the dough by combining the ingredients into a homogeneous sphere. Place the bottom and a piece of the side of the mold with the dough. Punch the bottom with a fork and put in the fridge. Heat the oven to 180 degrees C.
  • Place the baking tray with the dough in the oven and bake for 15 minutes for a pale golden color. Take out the dough, but do not turn off the oven.
  • Crumble: pour the flour into the bowl, add the sugar and cut into pieces cold butter. Rub the butter with the rest of the ingredients with your fingers until you have a crumble (small pastry crumbs).
  • Strawberries: cut into smaller pieces (eg into quarters), put in a bowl, mix with potato flour.
  • Put the strawberries on top, put the crumble on top and put in the oven. Bake for approx. 35 – 40 minutes for a golden color. After baking sprinkle with powdered sugar.

All of those recipes look amazing, right? Aga is a world traveler, and it definitely shows in the foods she prepares! I love them! Unfortunately, I won’t be able to try the gazpacho because I’m allergic to raw tomatoes… but I hope you’ll tell me in the comments if it’s as tasty and delicious as it sounds!

And of course, it wouldn’t be a designer feature week without a fantastic sale and a special Free-With-Purchase offer! Not only is Aga’s entire shop marked down 30% OFF throughout her entire feature week (sale prices will be valid through 11:59pm ET on Thurs 2/8)… but she also has the following Free-With-Purchase offer available in her shop all week long, as well — spend $10+ in the Jimbo Jambo’s shop at The Digital Press and get the following item completely FREE!


ChloéAbout the author  Chloé is in charge of PR and communication for her small town by day, is a digiscrapper “by night,” and a photographer whenever the light is beautiful. She lives with her man and fur-babies in a small town of Alsace (in the northeast of France), where she loves to read, watch good TV shows (TWD being her absolute favorite), and just hang out with her friends — no matter if they are close by, online, or away in her Swiss hometown. She recently became quite obsessed with Bullet Journaling, FLyLady and Zero Waste.

Tutorial Tuesday | Transforming Templates

BlogHeaderTemplate

Welcome to another edition of Tutorial Tuesday here on The Digital Press blog! Today, I thought it would be helpful if I shared a few ways that you can creatively transform templates to fit your scrapbooking needs! These tips and tricks will help you get the most bang for your buck when purchasing and using templates!

More often than not I find I have more photos that I want to scrapbook, than the template allows for. To remedy this I often add in more photos in places on the template that are suggested to be papers. For this layout I use Anita Designs Quick Scraps Vol. 17:

ad_quickscraps17_preview

I altered the bottom left template by rotating & adding a photo to the spot that could have been background paper. I love the look of the larger unframed bottom photo behind the three framed photos. It gives the layout more dimension, helps tell the story & visually leads your eye across the page.

wicked-awesome_webJH

For this layout I used another template from the same pack (the top right template) and added a large photo underneath the layers of the template. Large photos help showcase the subject of a page and  are a a great way to catch the eye of the reader.

young-wild-and-free_web

Another way to use templates is to break up your single photo to fit multiple spots. For this layout I used another template by Anita Designs A December Story Captured (template 21)

ad_adecstorycapt2016_tp21

I placed a single photo in the three photo slots in the template. To get this look I merged the three photo layers (Command +E) in the template and then placed my photo on top of that layout and clipped it (Command +G) to the frames.  A super easy and unique look to make a template work to tell your story!

crazy_webJH

You can also rotate and delete parts of a template to make them work for your layout. I did exactly that with the bottom left template by Dunia Designs:_dunia_soco_springdays_templates

Again a large photo takes center stage of the layout. I rotated the entire template and moved everything to the bottom quarter to make more room to showcase the large photo. You can always move and tweak a template to make it work. Start with the end in mind and you can make your vision come to life with a few little changes!

candid-photograph_web

Remember just because a template is set up one way by a designer, it doesn’t mean you have to keep it that way! Change those templates up and make them work for you and your personal style! Happy Scrapbooking!


JenniferHigniteJennifer Hignite is a mom of three boys and new homeowner with her fiance in the mitten state of Michigan. When she is not scrapbooking, she enjoys photography, watching her boys play sports, decorating, and shopping at Target.

Hybrid How-To | Halloween Countdown Decor

ahgordon_octhybrid_tdphead

Hello and HaPpY OcToBeR!!! And Happy Digital Scrapbook Day! Arielle here and I’m so glad you stopped by today! I have a great project that will get you all scrappy this weekend – snipping and gluing and layering – oh my! I’m going to show you how I designed this little Halloween Countdown decor, and give you some tips on creating your own Halloween decor!

Here are the supplies I used:

  • Digital Kit – Magic Hour by Mari Koegelenberg
  • Thin cardstock
  • Adhesives (I used an ATG gun & dimensionals)
  • Scissors and paper trimmer
  • Other embellishments such as buttons and twine.
  • Base material – you can adhere your decor to an adhesive magnet sheet to use on your fridge or a filing cabinet or you could mount it to black foam core.

mkc-magichour-kit

Step One – Design your project! I like to pick my kit and completely design my project In Photoshop before I print out the elements. That way I know everything will work together and I will only print what I need for the project.

I found this antique~y frame in another kit and blew it up, adjusted the threshhold settings and superimposed it over the star paper. I used some free spooky fonts, as well.

ahgordon_octhybrid_tdp

(Once my design is complete, I divide all the elements onto separate sheets for printing. I usually throw in some extra elements in case I mis-cut something or I decide it needs a little something extra!)

ahgordon_octhybrid_tdp-5

Step Two – Print your elements and gather your supplies! It’s always a great idea to add some buttons, gems, ribbon, twine… you get the idea – mix in some real stuff. It will be fun & you can’t get it wrong. I promise.

ahgordon_octhybrid_tdp1

Step Three – Trim out your elements. Yes, you could think of this as tedious… or you can realize it’s really therapeutic! I just love cutting out cute little things!

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Step Four – My frame paper printed really dark, so I went back in with a white pencil to add a little definition. Don’t be afraid to grab paint, glitter or other media to layer onto your project! It adds another dimension to your hybrid work!

ahgordon_octhybrid_tdp3

Step Five – Start layering! Pop up different layers with dimensional adhesives. It’s great when you can find them at different heights. Add some different textures, I used buttons and twine. (I added a couple enamel dots to the cat’s eyes, too!)

ahgordon_octhybrid_tdp4

(I made my own Halloween “sticker” by just leaving a white border as I trimmed around the word. I used a craft knife to cut out the space in the “H”. I added some depth to my paper flowers by pressing them into my palm to push the petals up!)

ahgordon_octhybrid_tdp5

Here’s the finished project! I still can’t decide if I want mine on my fridge or my wall, but I have both magnetic sheets and black foam core when I do! I’ll just trace around my frame, and trim the backing to size.

ahgordon_octhybrid_tdp6

Craft stores also sell all kinds of blank signs you could use as a base – canvas, chalkboard, wood, burlap. You could also make a hybrid Halloween banner or bunting, on paper or fabric. hey, you could even print out a bunch of these and let your kids decorate a tin can pencil holder or a cute garland!

Now it’s your turn! Want to try your hand at some hybrid Halloween decor? It can be as easy and as simple as you want it to be! Please come join us in The Digital Press’s forum for a fun challenge related to this tutorial! You can create an amazing item for yourself or someone you love AND earn points doing it! Points can later be cashed-in for discount coupons to the shop at the end of the month if you participate in the challenge system at The Digital Press!

Tutorial Tuesday | Capture the Everyday

I’ve been following a few photography challenges this year, and even if I don’t do them every week (or at all, let’s be honest!), they are slowly influencing me and helping me see my daily world with new, creative eyes. A few days ago I was doing our laundry and decided to capture this everyday, mundane task as artistically as possible, and in as many different ways as I could think of. And it was so, SO fun!
Capture the Everyday

Of course, some of my images didn’t turn out… but that’s OK because experimenting was part of the fun. I decided to implement various photography techniques — like macro, changing angles and perspectives, long exposures, purposeful blurs, compositional “rules” like leading lines, centered compositions, repetition/pattern, texture, rule of thirds, etc.

Capture the Everyday

This was truly an eye-opening experience and I never thought photographing something as mundane as the laundry would be so fun and could bring so much variety in the images.

Capture the Everyday

To add some cohesiveness to the photos I took, I edited them all with The Basics Lightroom Presets (#1) by Dunia Designs.

If you, too, want to see — and document — your everyday life with new eyes, why not try something similar?

  • Grab your camera and focus (pun intended!) on some daily aspect of your life — a task (like my laundry), an object, a place, etc. You don’t need much time to do this; 5-10 minutes is plenty to do this sort of creative exercise
  • Try to look at your everyday event like an explorer would when discovering a new civilization. Forget everything you know about this thing and try to see it with fresh eyes, as if it were the first time you laid your eyes on it
  • Then… simply grab your camera and start playing! Change your angles, take a wide shot to capture the whole environment (or the opposite — come closer and do a close-up shot), play with light and shadows, experiment with the composition rules and have fun. Maybe you won’t produce a masterpiece but you will definitely start seeing your world with new eyes!

I hope you’ll have fun experimenting and being creative, and I’d LOVE to see the result if you try your hand (and eye) at it! You can leave links to photos in the comments, below… or if your photos actually result in the creation of a scrapbook layout, you can post it in TDP’s gallery and then link me up here!

 


ChloéAbout the author  Chloé is in charge of PR and communication for her small town by day, is a digiscrapper “by night,” and a photographer whenever the light is beautiful. She lives with her man and fur-babies in a small town of Alsace (in the northeast of France), where she loves to read, watch good TV shows (TWD being her absolute favorite), and just hang out with her friends — no matter if they are close by, online, or away in her Swiss hometown. She recently became quite obsessed with her BuJo (bullet journal) and can’t wait to discover how much it’ll help her improve her (so far non-existent!) organisational skills!

Hybrid How-To | Straw Rockets

Are you ready for something fun and easy? I found this simple project on Pinterest, and knew it would be the perfect way for my littles to spend a summer afternoon.

Supplies Needed:

  • Digital image of your choice (I used the rocket from County Fair, seen below)
  • Cardstock
  • Scissors
  • Hot Glue
  • Curling ribbon (optional)
  • Straw

Directions:

  1. Print out the image you want and cut it out. Before printing, make sure the image is the size you want. It shouldn’t be too small; I actually ended up making the rocket from the kit a little bit bigger.

  1. Next, cut a rectangle of out of plain paper (I just used some scratch paper). It needs to be a little longer than your image.
  1. Roll the rectangle paper around a pencil and glue the edge together to form a tube. Pinch one end of the tube and glue together so that the end is sealed. At this point, I decided to glue some curling ribbon to the bottom of my rocket. Next, glue the tube to the back of the image.

 

And that’s it!

Now you can slide the tube over the top of the straw… and blow to make it fly. 🙂


Kate

 

About the Author  Kate is on the hybrid team here at The Digital Press. She lives on the Utah/Colorado border with her husband, 5 kids, 10 chickens, and a dog named Gracie. She’s a city-born girl who found she’s really a country girl at heart. She can be found outside, barefoot, and probably in her garden.