Hybrid How-To | Valentine’s Day Trading Cards

Hello everyone! It’s Tanya here, and I’m excited to share another edition of our Hybrid How-To series with you here on The Digital Press blog today! I seriously can’t believe it’s already mid-February and almost Valentine’s Day. Today, though, I’m here to teach you how to use your digital supplies to make some super cute Valentine’s Day trading cards… a project which will hopefully remove the stress of this holiday already being upon us!

You have plenty of time to grab a digital kit or two and create some fun Valentine’s Day cards for your little ones to trade with others; it’s definitely a project you can complete this weekend!

SUPPLIES NEEDED:

  1. Your favorite digital Valentine’s Day kit(s)
    (or, you can go the unconventional route and use non-themed kits that have fun papers/elements you like!)
  2. White cardstock
  3. Double-sided tape
  4. Paper cutter
  5. Scissors
  6. Valentine’s candy
  7. Washi tape

For this project, I used the following digital products (as you can see, I went the “unconventional” route and used non-Valentine’s-themed items — Be The Magic Be A Unicorn by Rachel Etrog Designs -and- Rawr Like A Dinosaur by Mari Koegelenberg)…

I created these fun school Valentine’s cards in Silhouette Studio, but you can use any photo editing program; I really like the software and I find it very easy to use (most of you already know that my favorite thing to do with my Silhouette machine is Print and Cut; this time, however, I actually designed and printed and then used my paper trimmer to finish them off).

The first step is to open the images and papers you want to use. For the paper, I drew out a rectangle in my software and and then did a drag and drop. Then I began layering until I got the desired look I wanted…

Here is a look at the final image I ended up with, after doing the steps above…

You’ll find that there are sooooo many possibilities for what you can do! Just play around and have fun! There are some really cute embellishments in the kits I used, so I just experimented until I found something that worked.

The next step is to duplicate them and print as many as possible onto one page. Here, I was able to fit eight on one page, but if you find that you would like them to be a little larger, you can definitely go with six…

Now, we’ll create the back of the card the same way we created the front (choose papers, embellishments, word art, etc… and layer until we have a design we like).

To print them onto the back of the cards we already printed, we will need to ensure that we use the same exact layout/arrangement when we print… and then we simply flip over our paper, fee it into the printer, and print side two. Make sure to follow your printer options for double-sided printing (if applicable); on my printer, to print on the back side of a page, I have to insert it printed side up (but know your own printer, and/or experiment to be sure!).

After I created the unicorn cards shown above, I decided to make another Valentine’s Day card design — this time, using the Rawr Like A Dinosaur kit. This was created the same way I created the cards up above.

Here’s a look at the design I settled on…

Again, I arranged them 8-to-a-page… and then printed the front sides before flipping it, putting it face up in my printer, and printing the back sides.

 

After we have finished printing the cards, we’ll use our paper trimmer and/or scissors and cut them out…

After trimming, you’ve got yourself some super cute custom double-sided Valentine’s Day cards!

At that point, you can prep them for trading with friends by having your little one sill out & sign all of them.

Aren’t these just the cutest?  There is nothing like creating your own things… especially when you get to share them with others!

Finally, I like to use cute patterned washi tape to attach some candy goodies to the cards, if you choose to…

There are so many fun things you can do to create your own Valentine’s Day cards! Not only do you have endless options for graphics, colors, and phrases when you look through your own digital stash… but if you google “Valentine’s Day puns,” there are tons of other funny and cute ideas out there!

I hope that this simple tutorial will help inspire you to use your own digital scrapbooking stash to create some really fun and unique cards for this Valentine’s Day! Have fun!


Tanya

About the Author  Tanya is a part of the hybrid team here at The Digital Press. She has been hybrid crafting for at least 16 years now, and loves creating and sharing those creations with others. Her all-time favorite tool is her Silhouette Cameo. She has been married for 29 years to her high school sweetheart, Richard and has two sons: Chris, 26 and Chance, 22. She also enjoys crocheting, photography and woodworking.

 

Hybrid How-To | Thankful Tree

Hello, everyone! Kate here to show you how to use your digital paper to make a lovely center piece that also doubles as a gratitude reminder. It’s the perfect project for November!

Supplies

  • Digital kit of your choice. I used Felicity by Little Lamm Co.
  • Photo editing program such as Photoshop or Photoshop Elements
  • Cardstock
  • Cutting machine or scissors
  • branches – real or fake. I used some fake light-up branches that I can use year after year.
  • Container like a vase or a jar
  • mini clothespins or string

Instructions

I found some leaf shapes in my digi stash that served as templates. I clipped the digital paper to the leaf templates, then printed and cut everything. Felicity had some cute tags that I printed as well. And I think I used every single paper in that kit – they were all so pretty!

Next, I arranged the branches in my container and added some pinecones and other filler. I put all the leaves, tags, clothespins and a pen into a bucket next to the tree. We’ve asked the whole family to write down what they’re grateful for on the different leaves and tags and then pin them on the tree branches as the month goes on.

I want to make this a yearly tradition for our family! And my hope is that it will be a reminder for all of us about the things that truly matter as we go into this holiday season.


Kate About the Author  Kate is on the hybrid team here at The Digital Press. She lives on the Utah/Colorado border with her husband, 5 kids, 10 chickens, a dog named Gracie, and a cat named Kit. She’s a city-born girl who found she’s really a country girl at heart. She can be found outside, barefoot, and probably in her garden.

Hybrid How-To | DIY Hybrid Kids’ Games

Hello, and welcome to another edition of our always-popular Hybrid How-To series here on The Digital Press blog!

I’m here today to show you how to use your favorite digital supplies to create kids’ games…such as the fun BINGO game you see pictured below.

This project is soooo simple, and really just requires a BINGO template and your favorite digital kits to create.

Let’s get started!

The first thing you’ll want to do is decide on a theme for your game cards, if desired, and choose a digital kit (or a selection of kits) that contain images that you’d like to use. For my Halloween-themed BINGO cards, I chose an awesome new collection called Spellbound that was designed by Little Lamm Paper Co., shown here…

I used the images contained within this collection to get started on filling up my BINGO card. I chose to make 6 different cards, and in doing so I placed the different images/stickers (like the tickets, candy, bat, ghost, potion and jack-o-lantern) into different spots on each card, filling all of the squares of a simple BINGO template I’d created (one of which I’ve shown here)…

When I found that I needed more images than the stickers I found in the kit, I decided to look at using the word strips and stamps, as well. I liked the tickets, the two flairs, and a circle with “Happy Halloween” printed on it… so I used those, as well. I also decided to use two ‘swatches’ of paper to represent a spider web and the color orange.

I also used a dingbat font (you can find some really great dingbat fonts for FREE on the internet) for shapes such as the cute black cat you see in the 3rd row of the card shown above. It started out as a plain black font, however… and I wanted to jazz it up a bit. In this next screenshot, you can see I found dingbat font shape I wanted — a cat — and then I simplified the layer and clipped a paper to it (the black/grey chevron pattern) from the Spellbound kit I was using…

I also added in an orange paper behind the cat shape for the eyes and just erased the parts I didn’t need… so the orange would show through the “holes” where the eyes were in the dingbat font. Cute, right? Such a simple way to add a cat into my BINGO card even though the actual digital collection I was using didn’t have one. 🙂 (I repeated this same process to create a witch’s hat and a flying witch).

As I worked, I found that this project was a wonderful way to re-think my digital products, and was a great way to re-purpose a bunch of things! For instance, I used two chipboard numbers (“31”) from a girl-themed kit to stand for the day of the month/Halloween. I also was able to use shapes like the circle moon and star from other kits, re-purposing them for this project.

Here’s a look at a bunch of my cards after I was finished creating them in Photoshop, and printing them out…

Aren’t these cards fun?

I hope today’s tutorial inspires you to re-think your own digital supply stash, and have fun playing with your digital products to make something completely new, fun, and festive — something as simple as an everyday BINGO-themed game!

Don’t forget to visit the CROSSWORD SECTION in The Digital Press forum, and jump into this month’s Hybrid Challenge if you are thinking of trying out this project. You can earn points toward discounts & FREEBIES! I hope that you will join in!


00 Headshot

About the Author  Sabrina is an avid documenter of life — herself, her children, her hubby, and her everyday life. There is beauty in the ordinary moments, and they are what she loves to scrap. She is also always on the hunt for a quiet, peaceful moment… and she usually spends it reading or playing at her crafty desk.

Hybrid How-To | Chore Chart

Hello, everyone! Kate here to show you how I made our family chore chart. Every couple of years our chore chart gets a reboot because things change a little bit. This year, I’m adding our youngest (who is now old enough to help) and taking away chicken chores because my oldest has taken that over as part of her involvement with FFA.

Supplies

– Digital kit of your choice. I used Monthly Chronicles: Carefree.

– Photo-editing program, such as Photoshop or Photoshop Elements

– Scissors

– Lamination paper

– Glue dots

– Binder clips

– Tacks

– Cork Board

The first thing I did was type out every single chore in all the rooms of our house. I like to have one room per day deep-cleaned and the rest of the rooms tidied up. Obviously that will vary depending on preference. This is what works for us. I printed this list out so it would be easy to refer to and check off when working on the cards.

I have five kids so I made five cards per room. I started assigning chores to each card. Once I had all the cards built, I clipped in fun paper and printed everything out. My kids requested a “for hire” section where they can earn some money doing non-required chores. We also rotate the chore cards so no one gets the same chores all the time. I added a little element that I can switch between names on the chore chart to keep track of who gets the Number 1 card each day. And I also needed a tab to keep track of who’s helping me with dinner and clean up each night, because we also rotate that between kids who are 8 years and older.

I used lamination paper to laminate everything except the name cards so we can check things off or write things down.

I used tacks to secure the binder clips to the cork board. I attached magnets to the back of the two tabs I need for rotation. The name tags and “for hire” arrow are secured to the cork with glue dots.

And here’s my finished chore chart. I hope you’ll give this customized chore chart a try!


Kate About the Author  Kate is on the hybrid team here at The Digital Press. She lives on the Utah/Colorado border with her husband, 5 kids, 10 chickens, a dog named Gracie, and a cat named Kit. She’s a city-born girl who found she’s really a country girl at heart. She can be found outside, barefoot, and probably in her garden.

Hybrid How-To | Halloween Party Fun

Hello everyone! It’s Tanya here, and I’m excited to share another edition of our Hybrid How-To series with you here on The Digital Press blog!

I don’t know about you, but I love fall. I love the crisp cool air, the colors, the smells, and the events to come… October Fest, Old Settlers Day, and most of all HALLOWEEN (the cutesy, not scary)! Today I am going to show you how to create some fun Halloween party supplies using your favorite Halloween digital kits!

I have several fun things to show you…. so let’s get started.

SUPPLIES NEEDED:

  1. Your favorite digital Halloween kit(s)
  2. White cardstock
  3. Pop dots
  4. Double sided tape
  5. Wooden picks for cupcake toppers
  6. Party Straws
  7. Ribbon
  8. Plastic silverware
  9. Scissors

For this project, I used the following digital products…

[ the brand new kit Spellbound by Little Lamm Paper Co, — Spooky by Little Lamm Paper Co. — and Spook by Karla Noel ]

*NOTE* I have recently upgraded from Silhouette Studio Edition software to the Silhouette Business Edition. There are a few features that I have really liked so far… the biggest being that with the Business Edition is that you can use more than one computer at a time. I haven’t tried it yet, but I will soon!

For my first step, I opened the following silverware box cut file that I already had in my stash of hybrid files. I did reduce the file size by just a little (and after cutting it out, I’ve decided that you can go even a tad smaller if you want to; It’s just one of those things you have to play around with)…

My next step was to choose digital paper for my project. For this, I opened the file where my paper was saved on my computer and drug it straight to the box file within my Silhouette software. You can see here how simple it is (and note that you can go into FILL PANEL and adjust the size and orientation of the paper)…

Next, I continued opening the elements and journal cards that I wanted to use for this project. I moved them around until I was happy with the placement. I love to have dimension on my projects, so I usually cut out extra pieces that I want to be raised up. This isn’t necessary, but I think it gives a neat finish to the project. However, if I were having a really large party, I don’t think that I would waste the time or money doing this.

After I finished creating the party supplies I printed each sheet out, ran it through my cutting machine, and assembled as shown below. Here are a couple of tutorials from TDP’s blog if you need more info on print and cuts… HERE & HERE. I used double sided tape to assemble, and then I used pop dots to attach the embellishments I’d cut out in order to add dimension.

Once I had the silverware holders assembled, I filled them with plastic cutlery…


Next came the cupcake holder… and for this, I opened a cupcake cut file that I created a while back. It’s simple and no scallops, and so I thought for Halloween it would be a good choice. I created toppers, as well, with extra pieces for dimension.

After creating the pieces you see above… I simply print, cut, and assembled…

*NOTE* For the toppers, I used little flat wooden sticks that I purchased from Hobby Lobby (they can be found in the raw wood section; I have also seen them at JoAnns Fabrics). I prefer using these over toothpicks because they are flat and your toppers lay flat without ugly ridges in your toppers. I used double sided tear tape to assemble. You can use glue, but the tear tape is awesome.


Finally I created some candy treat toppers, as well. For these, I created 2″x 2″ squares, filled them each with digital papers, and then added some elements. Again, I also added extra elements with pop dots for dimension.

To assemble the toppers, I used 1″ treat bags and filled them with Halloween-colored M&M’s. For the topper, I cut strips of black card stock just a little bigger than the printed square… and then I used double-sided tape and pop dots to assemble…

Below are some of the close ups of all of the projects shown above. Aren’t these the cutest thing you’ve ever seen?!

I also created straw toppers for this Spooky party. I really adore these cute elements. I like the fun part of Halloween, not the really scary part!

I hope that you have enjoyed this edition of Hybrid How-To. Don’t forget to visit the CROSSWORD SECTION  in The Digital Press forum, and jump into this month’s Hybrid Challenge if you are thinking of trying this project. You can earn points toward discounts & FREEBIES! I hope that you will join in!


Tanya

About the Author  Tanya is a part of the hybrid team here at The Digital Press. She has been hybrid crafting for at least 16 years now, and loves creating and sharing those creations with others. Her all-time favorite tool is her Silhouette Cameo. She has been married for 29 years to her high school sweetheart, Richard and has two sons: Chris, 26 and Chance, 22. She also enjoys crocheting, photography and woodworking.

 

Hybrid How-To | Starting a Traveler’s Notebook

Hi everyone, and welcome to another edition of our Hybrid How-To series here on The Digital Press blog! I’m here today to show you how you can start a Traveler’s Notebook and use it for your memory keeping.

Everywhere I look, I am seeing people using Traveler’s Notebooks (also called TN’s) to document all kinds of things… not just trips and vacations! If you look on Pinterest, ETSY, Amazon, or even if you just google “traveler’s notebooks” …you will get a wide display of manufacturers, sizes, and different ways people are using them. Today I would like to show you a bit about the traveler’s notebooks I am using, and how/why I decided to start using them for all sorts of scrapbooking and memory keeping projects!

Here’s just one example of the types of things you can do with a TN, with regard to memory-keeping…

Here are a few of the reasons I decided to give traveler’s notebooks a try:

  • quick, flexible memory keeping
  • no pressure to do a weekly or monthly layout
  • easy way to break into doing a hybrid project
  • no plastic pockets (unless you want them as accessories)
  • simplicity — photos, journaling, and maybe some stickers & washi tape
  • great for quick topics (vacations, food, recipes) or to record ongoing progress (weight loss, pregnancy, etc.)
  • I, personally, am drawn to the vertical orientation
  • easy to use to document things while on-the-go
  • great way to use digital templates, patterned papers, & supplies

Here’s a look at the Traveler’s Notebooks I am currently using…

I picked a few of them up at my local scrapbook store, and one is from a scrapbooking subscription club. As you can see, two of them are the “standard or regular” size (on the right), and one is a smaller size that is often referred to as the “passport” size (on the left). I didn’t spend too much money on any of them, because I wasn’t sure how often I was going to use them. It turns out, though, that I am documenting in them quite often and may eventually splurge for one of the real leather notebooks. For now, however, I am happy with these less expensive TN’s! They are made of a soft “plether” (plastic/leather) type of material, and come with the elastic bands inside that hold the inserts, and also a band that goes around the book to hold it closed.

Most TN’s come with at least one paper insert. The inserts can be made out of different colors, weights and styles of paper. Here’s a closer look at the inserts from the three TN’s I showed you, above…

The type of paper insert is important depending on how you are going to use them. For instance, f you do a lot of painting or stamping, then a thicker paper maybe needed. If you are mostly journaling in them, maybe you will want plain or lined paper instead of a dot or grid pattern. The color of the paper is important, too, if you want to work directly on that paper; for instance, up above you can see that one of these paper inserts is very cream in color, as opposed to a more pure white — but since I usually cover the insert with patterned paper, that worked for me.

One of mine came with a craft folder that has a place to put supplies and/or keepsakes, as shown here…

Some inserts are stitched together, and some are stapled… and this is also something to consider. The first TN I used had an insert that was stapled together… which enabled me to take the staples out and have flexibility moving the papers and getting them to lay perfectly flat while stamping or gluing things in place, which was nice! Since that first book, I have just left the inserts intact. Both ways work really well, and I think it is just a matter of personal preference.

There are many types of accessories and extra options you can purchase to use with your TN. Extra elastics, charms to put on the outside bands, tags, plastic pockets, zipper cases, and pen loops are all very popular and help you customize your TN…

I love the zipper pocket! Although I don’t scrapbook on-the-go very much, I often will stick in supplies that I want to use just to keep track of everything!

To give you a little more inspiration and let you see the kinds of things you can do with your TN… here are a couple of pages from my Summer 2018 Traveler’s Notebook…

And trust me, it’s all so easy! I simply printed some photos and products I liked, and then played around with putting them together on the pages. As you can see, this format works well for multi-photo pages and also for large photos. I use Epson Premium Presentation Matte paper and a Canon Pixma printer.

For the projects I’ve shown you, above, I printed digital products from these beautiful kits that you can find at The Digital Press…

The great thing about a TN is that you can use your favorite digital products and edit/alter the contents, re-size things, and even change a few colors here and there, before printing… in order to have your own personalized scrapbooking supplies ready to add to the TN. And as we discussed above, there are a lot of options to choose from when selecting and beginning a Traveler’s Notebook. Here are a few final thoughts you might consider, as you get ready to give this a try…

  • the cost — you can spend a lot or a little
  • the size — standard or regular is used by most scrapbookers (it is approximately 8.5″ tall by 4.25″ wide)
  • the paper inserts/refills — the color, weight and the style; grid, dot and lined patterns are popular
  • the topic — decide whether you want your book to be about a specific topic or just a bunch of random photos & stories you love
  • the record-keeping — TN’s are a great way to journal your thoughts, and many people use their own handwriting rather than typing
  • the supplies — use your digital supplies in a whole new way; journal cards, labels & pattern papers work well
  • the contents — large, full-size photos are dramatic and pair well with papers, journaling and embellishments
  • the rules — there are really NO rules! Just play around and find out what works for you!
  • the starting point — really, just get started! it’s so much fun to print, touch, and play around with the items you add to your TN

The important thing is to have fun with it and make it work for you. We would love to see what you create using products from The Digital Press, so please feel free to leave us comments and link us up to any projects you load into the hybrid gallery here at TDP!

 


IMG_2617lightedt100w

About the Author  KerriAnne is a homebody who resides in the desert SW. She started scrapbooking when her kids were little and hasn’t stopped despite the teenagers rolling their eyes and sticking out their tongues!  When not scrapping or being a chauffeur, she can be found consuming large amounts of iced coffee.