Hybrid How-To | Fun Mini Book

Hi everyone, and welcome to another edition of our Hybrid How-To series here on The Digital Press blog!  Today, I’m here to show you how to create a very fun and easy mini book that you can make to keep your memories in a small and beautiful way.

For my project today, I will be using the digital kit (and also cards) Just Be You by Julia Makotinsky, shown here…

Let’s get started on our our mini book!

The first thing to do is to choose (a) the size of your mini book, and (b) the digital papers that you want to use.

I chose to make my mini book in the size of 4.5″ x 6″.  I also chose several elements and cards that I planned to use to embellish my project. 

As seen in the photos below, after choosing the papers, I printed them  in the size corresponding to the mini book. Then I cut and folded each sheet in half…


I wanted to make a fun cover for my mini book and use sequins for a magical unicorn effect. To do so, I decided to use a plastic page protector to put my sequins/embellishments inside and make my cover. First, I added a fun dimensional title onto one of my printed pages…

Then I added sequins and decorations into the protector, and used embroidery floss to sew it shut…
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To close the cover, I hand sewed the page protector with an embroidery chain stitch. If desired, you could also use a sewing machine or a fuse tool…

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Once I had my cover ready… it was time to make the inner pages of my mini book. The first thing I did was adjust the page sizes and cut off the excesses, as you can see here…

Before I could decorate any of my book’s pages, I needed to assemble my mini book.

*TIP* Make sure all your pages are folded down the middle and arranged in the order that you want them. Use two clips to hold the pages in place. Put an old catalog or a foam mat under your pages and line up their centers. This makes it really easy and safe to punch through all the pages. You’re going to punch three holes using a paper piercing tool. Use a ruler to mark where you’ll punch these holes. My mini book is 6″ tall, so I punched the center hole at 3″, as shown here…

I used the holes I’d punched into my book to attach all of the pages/cover together using embroidery floss…

How To Stitch Your Journal:

  1. You should have already punched your three holes. Thread your needle with a long piece of cotton and thin crochet thread. Start at the center hole, insert the needle from the inside of the journal, and pull the needle through but leave a long tail.
  2. Push the needle from the outside of the journal through the top hole.
  3. Next, push the needle from the inside of the journal through the center hole again
  4. Next, push the needle from the outside of the journal through the bottom hole.
  5. Bring the bottom hole thread to the center hole and tie both ends. You are done! The book is bound and it’s time to insert our photos and embellishments.

I printed several elements and cards, as you can see here…

Here is a look at a few of my pages once I’d started embellishing them with all of my printed goodies. As you can see, I also used vellum and watercolor paper in order to make my project more fun…

Finally, I also used some mixed media techniques along  my project., like watercolors and acrylic paints.

Isn’t this mini book fun? And it’s a very beautiful way to have fun with your memory keeping, as well!

If you’re feeling inspired to give this a try, as well… don’t forget that you can earn challenge points at The Digital Press! Come visit the CROSSWORD SECTION in The Digital Press forum, and you’ll find this month’s Hybrid Challenge thread (for each month’s Hybrid Challenge at TDP, you get to choose one of the month’s “Hybrid How-To” tutorial posts from here on the blog and make your own version). You’ll see how fun it is! Give it a shot, and share your final results with us. We can’t wait to see what you come up with.

Have a great weekend you guys, and happy scrapping!


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About the Author  Andrea Albuquerque is member of the hybrid creative team here at Digital Press. Andrea has been a scrapper since 2010 and a photographer since 2012… and although she adores the flexibility and creativity of digital, she can’t resist playing with paper, paint, and embellishments. Hybrid scrapping is the perfect medium for her! She lives in Brazil with her hubby.

 

Hybrid How-To | DIY Seasonal Banner

Hi everyone, and welcome to another edition of our Hybrid How-To series here on The Digital Press blog! I have a fun project to share with you today that will get your home ready for the summer season. It’s a fun, simple way to decorate for any new season using your digital scrapbooking supplies.

Let’s get started…

For this tutorial, I will be using the latest TDP Designer Collaboration, called Popsicle. It just launched in the shop last week, and it’s perfect for this project!

To begin, I opened up the kit and decided to use one of the banner shapes (see bottom right of the preview, above) as a “template” for my own banner. I pulled it into Photoshop and enlarged it* to 375% so the banner shape was around the same size as a 3×4 pocket card. Enlarging the banner allowed me to use it as template/clipping mask.

*please note that while you wouldn’t normally ever want to enlarge a digital scrapbooking element (because doing so results in a noticeable loss of quality/resolution)… for my purposes, it is OK because I am actually using it as a clipping mask. This means that the end result won’t show the banner image itself; specifically, if you look at the next screenshot, below… you’ll see that the “M” becomes really blurry when I enlarged it. That will be covered up, though, so it will be OK.

The following screenshot shows how big the banner is at 375% (as compared to an 8.5″ x 11″ page)…

Next, you can see how I used the enlarged banner shape as a clipping mask. I chose various papers and journaling cards, and then placed them directly above the banner shape layer in Photoshop. Once the desired paper/card was above the banner layer — I used the “clipping mask” function (CTRL-ALT-G in Photoshop; CTRL-G in PSE) to clip the items to the banner shape. This is what allows the paper/card to take the shape of the banner…


After that, I simply repeated the banner shape until I had enough different patterned shapes to be able to hang up a string of banners on my wall. Here is a look at a couple of the print sheets that I wound up with…

You’ll see that my print sheets included banner shapes in 2 different sizes (I wanted variation for my final product)… and also a few embellishments, which I eventually cut out and added as pop-ups on the banner itself, to add dimension/decoration.

Once I had cut everything out, I used twine (you can also use string, yarn, etc.) to string the pieces together. Here is a close up of my finished banner…

Just a side note — the 2 suns you see, above, are part of a free font (called “Sun and Stars”), and I used the sun shape as a clipping mask with papers from the kit. I clipped an orange paper and pink paper to them, in order to match the rest of the items I printed/cut.

Here’s a view of my final banner, hanging on the wall, along with some other summertime decorations in my house…

Isn’t that fun? I hope this simple banner inspires you to decorate for the season and to try using your digital supplies in a new way!

If you’re feeling inspired and you’d like to give this a try, too, don’t forget that you can earn challenge points at TDP! Come visit the CROSSWORD SECTION in The Digital Press forum, and you’ll find this month’s Hybrid Challenge thread (for each month’s Hybrid Challenge at TDP, you get to choose one of the month’s “Hybrid How-To” tutorial posts from here on the blog and make your own version). You’ll see how fun it is! Give it a shot, and share your final results with us! We can’t wait to see what you come up with.


00 Headshot

About the Author  Sabrina is an avid documenter of life — herself, her children, her hubby, and her everyday life. There is beauty in the ordinarymoments, and they are what she loves to scrap. She is also always on the hunt for a quiet, peaceful moment… and she usually spends it reading or playing at her crafty desk.

Hybrid How-To | Shrink Plastic Bracelets

Hi, everyone! Kate here with another edition of our Hybrid How-To series here on The Digital Press blog. Today I am going to show you how to make these cute summer bracelets using printable shrink plastic and embellishments/etc. from your digital scrapbooking stash!

Supplies Needed

  • Digital elements of your choice (I used This Life: Summer Elements by Juno Designs)
  • Photo editing program (such as Photoshop, Photoshop Elements, etc.)
  • Printable shrink plastic
  • Cutting machine or scissors
  • Hole punch
  • Tin foil or parchment paper
  • Jump rings, clasps, crimp tubes, and a pair of needle nose pliers (optional, but gives jewelry a finished look)
  • Beads (optional)
  • Cord or elastic

The first thing to do is pull your chosen elements into your photo editing program and size them…

Every brand of shrink plastic is different, so check the packaging to determine how much bigger your shapes need to be to allow for shrinking. Mine needed to be 3x the finished size, as shown here…

At this point, I also added the holes for the jump rings. You can do this with a hole punch after you’ve printed and cut, but you have to punch the holes before you bake the pieces.

The next step is to print and cut. I used my Silhouette for this part, but I also used scissors to finish cutting through the plastic, in the end.

After that, it’s time to bake the pieces. Check the shrink plastic packaging for the specific instructions. I baked mine on foil at 325 degrees F for 2-3 minutes. While baking, they will shrivel up a bit and eventually go almost flat…

Immediately after pulling them out of the oven, I covered them with a sheet paper and used a piece of cardboard to push them down flat. To get the word art pieces to be rounded, however (see image above), I put them back in the oven for 20 seconds and then used a hot pad to wrap them around a pop can until they cooled.

The next step is to assemble the bracelets. I attached jump rings to each side of the shapes and then threaded the cord/elastic band through the rings, using a crimp tube to complete the loop on the back of the bracelet.

I added beads to the bracelets with elastic band to help keep the band in place. I used clasps the back of the word art bracelets.

And there they are! Using your favorite elements from a digital kit, you can have a cute set of coordinating bracelets.

I hope that you have enjoyed this edition of Hybrid How-To. Don’t forget to visit the CROSSWORD SECTION in The Digital Press forum, and jump into this month’s Hybrid Challenge if you are thinking of trying this project. You can earn points toward discounts & FREEBIES! I hope that you will join in!


Kate About the Author  Kate is on the hybrid team here at The Digital Press. She lives on the Utah/Colorado border with her husband, 5 kids, 10 chickens, and a dog named Gracie. She’s a city-born girl who found she’s really a country girl at heart. She can be found outside, barefoot, and probably in her garden.

Hybrid How-To | Gifts For Mom

Hello everyone! It’s Tanya here, and I’m excited to share another edition of our Hybrid How-To series with you here on The Digital Press blog! With Mother’s Day just around the corner, I thought I’d show you how to use your digital papers and/or elements to create a couple of cute (but simple!) gifts for Mom.

I made these gifts for my husband’s Mom for Mother’s Day, but you can change up the tag to suit any occasion.

SUPPLIES NEEDED:

  1. Your favorite digital scrapbook products
  2. White cardstock
  3. Glossy photo paper (not a must, but it works best)
  4. Circle &  scallop shaped punches
  5. Hole punch
  6. Wooden skewer or popsicle stick
  7. Ribbon
  8. Pop dots
  9. Tape
  10. Scissors

For my sample project, shown below, I used the following digital products: the Lean On Me kit by Anita Designs and Kim B Designs, and Simply Mom Word Art by Kim B Designs. Here’s a look at each of those…

For this project, I used my Silhouette Studio Business Edition software. You can use any photo editing software, however.  The first step is to draw out a 8 1/2 x 11 triangle.  To do this, I used the draw tools to the right of the work space…

Next, I filled the shape with a digital paper I choose by opening the fill pattern on the right…

The next step is to print it out. I have a HP Office Jet and it prints really nicely… but I’ve found that to get the best print possible, you need to make sure when you change between different types of paper that you go into your printer preferences and change the ‘paper type’ there, as well. I also turned ‘borderless’ to ON…

Now, the fun part — creating the little gift bag! Fold as pictured below. I used a flat card (like a credit card) to get good creases. When making your second fold, overlap just a little and use double-sided tape to hold it together. Then fold the bottom up, as shown…

Now, we’ll open the bottom of the bag as shown… and flatten it down… and then fold the top down…

We will do the same to the opposite side by folding the bottom up (I taped with scotch tape). Now, we’ll stick our hand into the bag to open it up. At this point, we’ll want to fold a small portion over and punch holes for the ribbon. Of course we’ll be filling the gift bag with Mom’s favorite treats before closing with the ribbon…

Here is a look at the finished gift bag… isn’t it cute?! Instructions for the tag can be found below, as well. 😉


Next, the cute matching tag!

For the tag, I used my Silhouette Studio software again… but just as with the bag, you can use any photo editing software and a couple of punches… no cutting machine necessary. I created several choices, including the tag that you saw on my gift bag, above… and also, a cute plant flag…

Like I mentioned, above… even though I used my Silhouette to cut out my tags, it’s not a must. You can see below how I also used a couple of hand-held punches…

Next, we will take the bamboo skewer and a couple of the printed pieces… and make a plant flag with all of it. The bamboo skewer will likely be too long, so we will need to trim it with a pair of scissors. We’ll also add a couple of pop dots to the back of the top layer of the flag (I also used a small piece of tape to secure the skewer down). Now we attach to the scalloped circle to create a pretty plant flag for Mom…

Here is a look at the finished project. Just a little touch to let Mom know we went the extra mile to make her feel special…

Aren’t they so adorable?

I hope that you have enjoyed this edition of Hybrid How-To. Don’t forget to visit the CROSSWORD SECTION in The Digital Press forum, and jump into this month’s Hybrid Challenge if you are thinking of trying this project. You can earn points toward discounts & FREEBIES! I hope that you will join in!


Tanya

About the Author  Tanya is a part of the hybrid team here at The Digital Press. She has been hybrid crafting for at least 16 years now, and loves creating and sharing those creations with others. Her all-time favorite tool is her Silhouette Cameo. She has been married for 29 years to her high school sweetheart, Richard and has two sons: Chris, 26 and Chance, 22. She also enjoys crocheting, photography and woodworking.

Hybrid How-To| Creating Interactive Features

Hi everyone, and welcome to another edition of our Hybrid How-To series here on The Digital Press blog!  Today, I’m here to show you how to create interactive features — such as flaps and pockets — to add to your hybrid and paper projects. It’s a really fun way to add more photos and journaling into your projects!

I think it makes a project more interesting and fun to add interactive pages, which give the possibility of finding some fun surprises by flipping open the pages within our  notebook — surprises like hiding journaling notes and even some photos under flaps and in pockets.

For my project today, I will be using one of TDP’s Monthly Chronicles digital collections — Bloom — shown here…

I’m going to be adding some of these interactive features to my own Traveler’s Notebook project.

Sometimes I want to work on smaller projects like this, because they’re very fun and not as time consuming. A Traveler’s Notebook is a great way to document things in a smaller format. We can make our spreads one day at a time, without being  overwhelmed about finishing a larger 12×12 page or even a full mini album. It’s also a good way to document a weekend, a trip, a single date or event, or any other small moment in our lives.

The first interactive feature I wanted to add was a tiered page, with multiple layers/flaps for the viewer to open. This is an easy technique that you’ll master in no time at all!

The supplies you will need are listed here:

  • digital printed papers
  • your favorite embellishments
  • your photos
  • trim and score board
  • double-sided tape or glue
  • a pencil

My Traveler’s Notebook is a standard size, measuring 4.33″ x 8.25″ — but you can apply this tiered page technique to any size page/album or any kind of journal, simply by adapting the measurements to fit your own project’s “canvas”. No matter what size you are creating, keep in mind that you will have to trim the paper slightly smaller  than your journal, for a nice border finish and to prevent your book from becoming too bulky.

First, I cut three pieces of different patterned paper, measuring as follows…

  • 3 1/4″ x 4″
  • 4 1/2″ x 4″
  • 5 1/2″ x 4″

Once my papers were cut, I folded them at 1/4″ from the top, as shown in the photo above.

Next, I glued the folded top 1/4″ of each of the 3 papers down onto my main notebook page, in 3 tiers, as shown here…

Each paper was glued just below the one above it. Here’s a look at the second level…

And finally, the lowest level (and what appears underneath it)…

Tips & Tricks:

  • Have your paper widths cut evenly so they will all line up perfectly.
  • Keep the paper that lines your page slightly smaller for a nice border finish and to prevent your book from becoming too bulky.
  • Make sure your fold lines are nice and crisp for a sleek finish.
  • For a softer edges, you can round the corners.
  • Use different contrasting papers for each tier, which really adds to the effect of this technique.

Here is a look at my final spread; you can see all 3 layers nicely on the left side…


The second interactive feature that I want to show you today is a fold-out page, as you can see in the following photo…

For this page, I chose my paper and cut it so that it measured 7-1/2″ x 8-1/8″. Then, I folded it at 3-1/2″ from the right side (as shown, above).

As you can see, the flap allowed me to insert three photos on the far right, and still have space for a lot of journaling in the middle section of my notebook.

It’s a really quick/easy technique that makes the page more fun and interactive!


Finally, the last interactive feature I want to show you is the addition of a pocket on one of the fold-out pages, as shown here…

For this pocket, I cut a piece of paper, measuring slightly smaller than my notebook page’s size (mine ended up being 4″ x 3-1/2″).

Then, I folded each side at 1/4″ in order to glue my pocket on my page…

Once the paper was glued down to create the pocket, I could start sliding items inside (like the 2 tags I created, shown here)…

Then I glued some photos onto the tags, and added tag strings, to make the process of pulling the tags in/out of the pocket really fun…

Here’s another look at the finished tags, out of the pocket…

Aren’t these techniques fun? And they’re really very easy, as well!

I hope that you have enjoyed this edition of Hybrid How-To! I had a great time making this project.

If you’re feeling inspired and you’d like to give this a try, too, don’t forget that you can earn challenge points at TDP! Come visit the CROSSWORD SECTION in The Digital Press forum, and you’ll find this month’s Hybrid Challenge thread (for each month’s Hybrid Challenge at TDP, you get to choose one of the month’s “Hybrid How-To” tutorial posts from here on the blog and make your own version). You’ll see how fun it is! Give it a shot, and share your final results with us! We can’t wait to see what you come up with.

Have a great weekend you guys, and happy scrapping!


 

About the Author  Andrea Albuquerque is member of the hybrid creative team here at Digital Press. Andrea has been a scrapper since 2010 and a photographer since 2012… and although she adores the flexibility and creativity of digital, she can’t resist playing with paper, paint, and embellishments. Hybrid scrapping is the perfect medium for her! She lives in Brazil with her hubby.

Hybrid How-To | Memory Flip Calendars

Hi everyone! This is Sabrina from the hybrid creative team at The Digital Press, and I’m here on the blog with you today to share a really fun and easy hybrid project that you can create in order to showcase some of your favorite photos — a memory flip calendar!

I think you’ll really love this project. Let’s get started!

To begin this project, I first gathered my favorite photos from 2017. I went with “weekly favorites” in order to correspond with the numbers on each of my date tags.

Once I had my digital photos collected and ready… I selected some digital products to use. Here’s a look at just a few of the products I chose to use (all of them came from the Sahin Designs shop at TDP)…

The main product I used, which became the foundation for my entire project, was the Equinox Tags (see above, upper left image).

After compiling my photos and digital products, I was ready to begin! The first step was to open the Equinox Tags in my photo-editing software; I use Photoshop Elements (PSE).

I decided to change the text on the tag from “day” to “week” (because my calendar was going to be a weekly calendar, instead of a daily calendar). I did this by covering the word “day” with a white piece of the tag to cover it up and then typing in the word “week” above it.

Here’s a look at the “before” tag (with the word “day” …and I’m in the process of getting ready to cover it with a rectangle of white tag)…

…and here’s where I covered it with the new word, “week”…

After getting the calendar date tags ready, as shown above… I began using the same tag shape as a clipping mask to shape my photos (in PSE, you place the photo in the layer above the tag… and use Ctrl-G to clip it; in Photoshop (PS) you do the same thing but the keystroke command is Ctrl-Alt-G).

As you see in this screenshot, my photo took on the same shape as the tag I clipped it to… 

Next came the fun part! …printing and putting everything together. 🙂

You can either use the print-&-cut feature of a paper cutting machine like a Silhouette… or… you can print and then fussy-cut by hand with scissors or a paper trimmer. Whatever works best for you!

Once I had everything printed & cut out, I attached my tags to single binder rings hanging from empty frames, as shown here…

 

Once I had it assembled, I found that it actually worked better if I trimmed off an additional 1/4-inch from each tag — to make the flipping of the pages easier once they were on the frame.

Here are a few more shots of the calendar and its different pages…

Isn’t that fun? A flip calendar to remember the best moments of the year!

I loved how this project came out… and I hope you’ll try making a fun memory flip calendar of your own, using your digital supplies! If you do… please share your projects with me — I’d love to see what you come up with! If you’re participating in The Digital Press’s challenge system for April 2018, don’t forget to visit the CROSSWORD SECTION in TDP’s forum to get the details about this month’s Hybrid Challenge — because you can earn challenge points if you give this project a try (earning you points toward discounts & FREEBIES)!


00 HeadshotAbout the Author  Sabrina is an avid documenter of life — herself, her children, her hubby, and her everyday life. There is beauty in the ordinary moments, and they are what she loves to scrap. She is also always on the hunt for a quiet, peaceful moment… and she usually spends it reading or playing at her crafty desk.