Hybrid How-To | Paper Pouches

Hello, everyone! Kate here to show you how to create these fun paper pouches — just in time for Easter!

Supplies

  • Digital kit of your choice (I used It’s a Spring Thing, found in the Juno Designs shop here at TDP)
  • Scissors or a straight cutter
  • Adhesive (for this project, I prefer glue dot strips OR hot glue)
  • Sewing Machine

Instructions

1. Print your chosen digital papers and cut into rectangles. Mine are 4″x5″ and 3″x5″…

2. Add the adhesive of your choice to the short edge of the rectangle and roll the paper up, adhering to the other short edge. You’re basically making a bunch of paper tubes.

3. Pinch one open end of the tube together and sew along the edge. Fill with candy, but don’t overfill or you will have trouble getting the other side to close. Once it’s filled, pinch the other end together — in the opposite direction (see below) — and sew along the edge…

And that’s all there is to it! I like to display these in a glass bowl on the coffee table, but they would also make an awesome edition to an Easter basket.

Want to give this a try (and earn challenge points toward the March 2017 challenges here at The Digital Press)? Come check out our monthly hybrid challenge information in the forum HERE.


Kate About the Author  Kate is on the hybrid team here at The Digital Press. She lives on the Utah/Colorado border with her husband, 5 kids, 10 chickens, and a dog named Gracie. She’s a city-born girl who found she’s really a country girl at heart. She can be found outside, barefoot, and probably in her garden.

Hybrid How-To | Create A Robot Party Favor

Hello everyone! It’s Tanya here for this week’s Hybrid How-To… to show you how to make a fun and easy robot party favor! 🙂

The minute I saw this adorable new Automated | Kit by Laura Passage, I knew I had to do something with it. My friends ask me all the time, “why do you make all these wonderful things and you don’t even have small children?” Want to know why?! It’s because I looooove hybrid crafting and sharing those craft ideas with you. I always hope that it will inspire you to take a shot at hybrid crafting and create something fun.

I don’t think Robot party favors were Laura’s original idea for the kit, but that is one on the reasons I love hybrid crafting… there can be soooo many uses for a single kit!

I used my Silhouette Cameo for this project… mainly because I’m spoiled by it! There are other ways to achieve the same results, however, and you don’t need a cutting machine in order to do this project.

To begin, you will need to separate the pieces of each robot so that you will be able to cut each different piece of the “puzzle.” To do this, open the element you want to use and copy it a couple of times (I do this just in case I need to go back to the original for any reason). Next go to trace, uncheck the high pass filter and then select trace and detach. As you move the threshold slider to the right, you can see the parts that will detach (highlighted yellow in the image, below). I will do this a couple of times, each time moving the slider to highlight more of the image to detach.

In this next image, you can see the other part of the image that will detach…

To get the rectangle (shown below, circled), I simply picked the rectangle tool and drew it out to the size I needed…

Next, you can see how I organized all my pieces on the mat (this is also how I will set up my scrap pieces of card stock when I actually cut with my machine)

Don’t forget to turn on the cut lines, as shown here…

For the base piece, I opened the trace image box and chose the trace outline box

The neat thing about using card stock (as opposed to printing and cutting using digital papers/patterns) is that you can use up all your old paper scraps. As you can see, below, I actually chose the colors that were in the kit… but you can use any color scraps you have on hand. You can see here that I was able to put five different colors on the mat at the same time… and boy, is this a time saver! (also, if you scroll up, 2 images above, you can see how the paper scraps in this next image match the layout of images I created in the software).

Here’s a look at all of the pieces, once I removed the excess cardstock…

As you can see in the next image, I actually had to re-cut a few pieces because my calculations were off. Oops! (not that I really calculated anything; I eyeballed it!)…

And finally, once you have all of the separate parts cut out… you will simply group them together to put into a cellophane bag (for the end-users to be able to assemble and create their own robots!)…

Here are the tags I created to tie to the gift bags…

And that’s it! A ready-made party favor to send with your guests, so they can go home and assemble their own robots. So much fun!

I hope that you have enjoyed today’s Hybrid How-To here on The Digital Press’s blog. Now it’s your turn to create something fun (with or without a cutting machine)! If you would like to earn points toward TDP’s monthly challenge system, visit the corresponding monthly Hybrid Challenge in the forum’s CROSSWORD SECTION (you’ll find it stickied up near the top during March 2017). We’d love to see your creations!


Tanya

About the Author  Tanya is a part of the hybrid team here at The Digital Press. She has been hybrid crafting for at least 14 years now, and loves creating and sharing those creations with others. Her all-time favorite tool is her Silhouette Cameo. She has been married for 28 years to her high school sweetheart, Richard and has two sons: Chris, 25 and Chance, 20. She also enjoys crocheting, photography and woodworking

Hybrid How-To | Bag Toppers

My daughter passed out donuts to her entire 5th grade class for Valentine’s Day. She wanted to add a little card or something she could sign her name to, so I whipped up these bag toppers we could staple to ziplock bags. It was such a quick project… and I was thinking it would be just perfect for any party favor. Throw the candy/treats/toys into any size bag and add the personalized topper. Fun and simple!

The first thing I did was measure the width of the bag. I used regular old sandwich bags for the donuts… each of which measured about 6.5″ wide. I wanted the front of the design to be 1.5″ x 6.5″ — making the total dimension for each topper (front and back) 3″ x 6.5″.

To do this, I clipped patterned paper to a simple rectangular template I made (see image, below), and then I designed the front of the topper using digital elements from the same kit. I kept my design flat — so it ended up being a simple flat digital design that I could easily print off (i.e. no extra cutting or assembling of extra embellishments/layers). I thought it would be easier that way since I was making like 30 of them. 😉

*PRO TIP* When creating your rectangular designs… make sure the “front” of the design stays on the bottom half of the template so it won’t be folded over to the back once you attach them to the bags.

After creating the design in Photoshop… the next step is to print, cut, and fold each topper in half. I filled all my bags with donuts, sealed the bags, and then stapled the toppers onto the zippered portion of the bags…

Here’s a look at the back (left) and front (right) of one of my topper designs…

This project literally took me about an hour from designing the toppers in Photoshop to completing the finished project — with no fancy cutting machine required. I hope you’ll give it a try!


Kate About the Author  Kate is on the hybrid team here at The Digital Press. She lives on the Utah/Colorado border with her husband, 5 kids, 10 chickens, and a dog named Gracie. She’s a city-born girl who found she’s really a country girl at heart. She can be found outside, barefoot, and probably in her garden.

Hybrid How-to | Creating a Hybrid Page Using a Digital Template

Hi everyone, It’s Saturday and time for another edition of our Hybrid How-To series here on The Digital Press blog!  Today, I’m here to help show you how easy it is to create a hybrid page using a digital template.

I love working with paper and physical elements/stamps, but sometimes I also miss being able to change things and make adjustments like I can with my digital layouts… so hybrid projects are my favorite way to make pages. The best of both worlds! I also think digital kits are a fantastic way to stretch our crafty budgets; we can print and cut as many times as we like.

When I make a hybrid page, I like to use the digital templates I have in my stash… and let me tell you, it’s really fun and easy!

For the layout I am making for today’s tutorial, I used two different digital products — a template from Sahin Designs — January 2017 Layered template 1

…as well as a digital kit by Little Lamm & Co. — Nonpareil Scrapbook Kit

With Valentine’s Day right around the corner, I’d like to celebrate my loves, so I’ll be making a page about them.

I’ll start out by creating my page in Photoshop, using my digital template and the digital items that I plan to print out. Here’s a look at the template, before I begin working…

…and here’s a look at the template once I’ve added my photo, digital papers, and embellishments…

After I have all of my printable items sized the way I want, I separate each of the pieces (see image, below right) and save them all as a PNG file to print and fussy cut. Although I have a Silhouette Cameo, sometimes I simply fussy cut just because I love it!

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I also print out the papers for the larger circles… and these I actually cut with my Silhouette Cameo (see full printed papers in image, below right)…

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As you can see, I duplicated some elements. I do this often just because I want to have some cute stash ready to use.

Here are my pieces printed and cut…

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After I have all my pieces cut out, I just put them back together on a physical 12×12 page and then add my elements, stamps, hand-stitching, and some spray ink splatters, as shown here…

And there you have it! A beautiful hybrid page without all the guesswork or the need to re-print several times to get things right. 🙂

If you’d like to give this a try, too, don’t forget that you can earn challenge points at TDP! Come visit the CROSSWORD SECTION in The Digital Press forum, and you’ll find this month’s Hybrid Challenge thread (for each month’s Hybrid Challenge at TDP, you get to choose one of the month’s “Hybrid How-To” tutorial posts from here on the blog and make your own version). If you choose to give today’s project a try… all you have to do is make a hybrid page using some digital elements and papers, along with a digital template as your foundation for the composition of the page. You’ll see how fun it is! Give it a shot, and share your final results with us! We can’t wait to see what you come up with.

Have a great weekend you guys, and happy scrapping!


AndreaAbout the Author  Andrea Albuquerque is part of the Hybrid Creative Team here at Digital Press. Andrea has been a scrapper since 2010 and a photographer since 2012. Although she adores the flexibility and creativity of digital, she can’t resist playing with paper, paint, and embellishments… so hybrid scrapping is the perfect medium for her! She lives in Brazil with her hubby.

Hybrid How-To | Printing & Cutting Digital Elements

It’s Saturday… and time for another edition of our Hybrid How-To series here on The Digital Press’s blog! Today, I’m here to help you all see how easy (and fun!) it is to use digital embellishments in your physical projects (like mini albums, and more)!

For those of us who can’t resist pretty paper and embellishments — digital kits are a fantastic way to stretch your crafty budget. For me, patterned papers and adorable die-cuts are probably the best thing about crafting. I am always a little reluctant, however, to use pretty items from my stash because they’re just so cute. For me, the real beauty of digital products is that I can print and cut as many times as I like. Buy a digital kit once, and you can use the items contained within it again and again and again!

For the mini album project I am going to show you today, I chose two kits from The Digital Press — the Go.See.Do collection by Mari Koegelenberg, and also Laura Passage’s Project Twenty Fifteen | July kit, both shown here…


I like to choose kits that are versatile and can be used for lots of different topics or occasions. Although each of these two kits are travel-themed, there are also plenty of generic elements and papers that I know I can use for so many different purposes (and also, for other projects in the future, as well!). For instance, see those tags and labels above? Or the word art stamps, flowers, stars, etc. in this next kit…

For my project, I documented some of our family travels from 2016 in a handmade mini-album.

I used a variety of methods to create the pages. For instance, as shown in the photos below, I created pages by printing out some of the digital papers as foundations for each page; some I made rectangular, and others I notched so that they were flag/pennant-shaped.

Once I had the foundation pages, I came up with some interesting things to attach to each of them (in addition to the photos). For example, I upcycled some old clothing tags to add a bit of interest… creating a title tag with date (top photo, left). I also upcycled some old envelopes that I saved from Christmas, and turned them into pockets (middle row, left). I filled a plastic page protector with sequins and sewed it shut (middle row, right). I also used various fasteners (paper clips, mini clothespins, string, etc.) to add dimension and decoration to each page. So easy!


But the main embellishments on my pages came from the digital kits. Not only did I print out the papers to create pages, I also printed out some of the flat elements and added them to my pages after cutting them out.

I’m lucky enough to own a Silhouette, and the best feature of a cutting machine is the ability to quickly print and cut the adorable elements found in digital kits. The Silhouette makes it a cinch to create my own die-cuts. Today, I’ll take you through the basic steps to trace an element and ready it for cutting.

Step 1:
First, you will need to set up your page to the correct size and add registration marks. These are printed on your page and used to align the cut later (see the marks in the corner of the page in the image below). Then you will drag and drop your digital element onto the page (that car is cute right?!). Anything in the cross-hatched area shown in the picture below won’t be cut… so make sure you position your element in the main body area. In order to cut around the outside of the element, click the Trace button. Then click Select Trace Area.

Step 2:
Now you will drag the box around the shape. The software analyzes the shape (yellow means that it won’t cut in that area). Depending on the shape and color, you may need to drag the sliders for High Pass and Low Pass filters (the more contrast in the image, the better the results). Note that in my example image, below, the car windows are not highlighted in yellow — so the Silhouette can cut the window detail if I want. I just want to go around the outside of the car, however, so I chose Trace Outer Edge.

Step 3:
Voila! In the next image, I moved the car so that you can see the cutting outline that has been created. I group the object and the outline together so that they can be moved around the page easily.

Now that we’ve dealt with how to trace an element… give it a try! Go wild and look at all of those fabulous elements in your digital kits in a completely new light. Think of the things you can do!

As shown in the next image, I added a couple more elements to my project. The trace function did an amazing job on the bicycle shape…

Another way to make the most of those great digital elements is to combine them to create your own elements. Above, you’ll see the yellow tag with “Family Time” written on it. To create that, I dropped the “Family Time” word art from the Project Twenty Fifteen | July kit onto a block of yellow paper… and then I inserted a tag shape over the top. Now I have my own custom-made tag element!

Of course, if you don’t have a cutting machine, you can also do all of this by hand. Fussy cutting is very therapeutic! I often find myself cutting out shapes by hand just because it’s relaxing and a lot quieter! 🙂

Here are a few more photos of my finished project… so you can see a few more examples of the fun things you can create when you print and cut digital elements…

Are you up for a challenge? If you come to the CROSSWORD SECTION in The Digital Press forum, you’ll find this month’s Hybrid Challenge thread… and if you try one of the two hybrid projects we’ve featured on the blog this month, you can earn challenge points for January! For today’s project, all you have to do is print and cut some digital embellishments and include them on a hybrid project of some kind. It doesn’t have to be a travel album — it can be anything, really (a card, a physical scrapbook page, a mini-album like mine, etc.) — as long as you can decorate it with some cut-out digital elements, any project goes! Give it a shot, and share your final results with us! We can’t wait to see what you come up with…


About the Author  Morag Cutts is part of the Hybrid Creative Team here at Digital Press. Morag has been an avid scrapper and photographer for ten years.  Although she adores the flexibility and creativity of digital, Morag can’t resist playing with paper and embellishments – so hybrid scrapping is the perfect medium for her!  Morag lives in the UK with her hubby, two kids and recently adopted puppy.

 

Hybrid How-To | School Valentine Exchange

Okay, I don’t know about you… but I totally CANNOT believe Christmas has already come and gone so quickly! Where in the world did this past year go? It’s 2017! I think I would love for things to slow down a bit, but I know that isn’t possible. 🙂

I know that most of you likely aren’t thinking about Valentine’s Day already (heck, most people don’t even have their Christmas decorations put away yet!)… but ready or not, Valentine’s Day is just around the corner! Therefore, I thought I would get a head-start and today I will be showing you several fun hybrid Valentine’s ideas! Some of them are for Valentine’s that have candy, and some are for those that do not. Either of them can be tweaked to your liking.

For this project, you do not need to have a cutting machine. All projects can be achieved with the supplies listed below. I did, however, use my Silhouette Studio Design space to create my ideas… although similar things can truly be achieved in any photo editing program.

There are tons of digital kits that would be great for this project… and remember, just because it isn’t actually a Valentine-themed kit doesn’t mean it can’t be used for Valentines! For instance, the kit Kindess is Cool (by LJS Designs) has a lot of Christmas-themed elements in it, but I also thought the bear would be adorable for Valentine’s Day. You could even use robot or space-themed kits for Valentine’s Day. This holiday is fun because you can come up with so many Valentine puns… just let your imagination run wild!

In the end, for the projects I will show you today… I decided on these two kits — It’s You I Like by Dunia Designs… and Kindness Is Cool by LJS Designs (I also used the coordinating Kindness is Cool Journal Cards that match the main kit).

The first 2 projects are related, and they’re both perfect for non-candy items like pencils. To begin, I simply drew out a 8.5″ x 11″ square and added the heart paper shown here…

Next, here is the image that I created using the digital elements from the same kit…

If you are using your cutting machine, simply print the image above, place it on your mat and send through to the cutter.  If you will not be using a cutting machine, print your image and follow the steps found below.

Here is a close-up look at what I created…

Once you have your papers/elements printed out… you will punch the layered pieces…  assemble them with the double-sided tape or glue dots (whichever you prefer and/or have on hand)… and then you attach them to the pencils and add a bow. Ta-da! That’s it! Pretty easy, huh?

For this next version, you will trim your printed paper down to the size you want (I cut mine to 2″ x 4-1/2″ and then after trimming, I used a corner punch and rounded the corners). Use the same punched embellishments from the first project, shown up above, and tape them to the center of your trimmed digital paper, as shown below. All you have to do then is add your pencil and that’s it! SO EASY!

The next idea is perfect to use as a plain Valentine’s Day card (and/or when paired up with a candy treat)… it’s super cute and super easy! Again, it can be created in just about any photo editing software; I used my Silhouette program to do mine because it is just as easy and sometimes even simpler than using Photoshop, etc.).

First, I picked out a journaling card from the set I was using, I added some embellishments, and I personalized it…

Next, I sent it to my printer and cut with my paper trimmer. I also made cute little envelopes out of white printer paper to go with the cards. You can tape a piece of candy to the back or not, whichever you decide…

As you can see, there are several quick and easy ideas to create unique and personalized treats for your child’s Valentine’s Day party. They don’t have to be exactly like the ones I’ve done here; you have plenty of time (as of right now… LOL) to get started and come up with a cute idea that you love! So rummage through that craft closet, pick out your favorite digital kit, and get started!

I’m always here to answer any hybrid questions you may have, so leave me a note in the comments if you need to know anything. Also… if you want to earn challenge points at The Digital Press during the month of January by creating one of these items… head over to the forum and join into our monthly challenge system!


Tanya

 

About the Author  Tanya is a part of the hybrid team here at The Digital Press. She has been hybrid crafting for at least 14 years now, and loves creating and sharing those creations with others. Her all-time favorite tool is her Silhouette Cameo. She has been married for 28 years to her high school sweetheart, Richard and has two sons: Chris, 25 and Chance, 20. She also enjoys crocheting, photography and woodworking.

Hybrid How-To | Decorate Your Home

 

Hello everyone!!  Today I’m here to show you how to create this cute sign with your digital word art stash.  I love crafting and especially hybrid crafting.   I made this one for my craft room.  I’ve also decided it’s the perfect time to get started on those Christmas gifts.  I don’t know about you, but I love getting and giving homemade gifts.  This year I’ve decide I’m going to make everyone a sign for their home.   The Digital Press has tons of word art kits.  There is something for everyone!!!

SUPPLIES:

  • Cutting Machine
  • Digital word art (From The Digital Press…of course)
  • Wood (I used scrap pieces I had laying around in the garage)
  • Paint – make sure to get matte
  • Paint Brushes (The cheap sponge ones are fine)
  • Vinyl
  • Transfer Tape

I used the new release, GRATEFUL, and ANOTHER 25 DAYS by Sabrina’s Creations.  GRATEFUL word art is perfect for home décor.

boards

There are different ways to achieve the same look.  Today we are going to do the PVPP method….Paint Vinyl Paint Peel

Prepare the wood.    To start off you will base coat the wood with the color that you want your word art to show.  On this project I base coated my board white because I wanted the writing to show up white.  While the wood is drying you will start getting your vinyl ready.

draganddrop

Open your cutting software.  Shown here is Silhouette Studio Designer Edition.  Simply open the file you have your word art saved it and drag the one you want to work with first to the mat.

You are going to have to give the image cut lines.  If you were to go to cut now, it would cut a square box around the image, because it’s not a svg file.  I will show  you how to TRACE the image so that you will have those cut lines.  Highlight the entire image and uncheck the High Pass Filer and move the Threshold over until the image is completely yellow.

cutfileattop

Now select Trace. Move the image over and you can see the red lines.  These are the cut lines.  You can delete the black image now.

cutsetting

Cut your vinyl to size, apply to your mat, load and cut.  Make sure that you have chose the right material type and have changed your blade settings.  I don’t think you have to change your blade on the newer machines.

Now it’s time to weed your image.  To start off you will remove the bigger pieces around your image (1).  Next, you will use a weeding tool or a safety pin to remove all the smaller pieces (2).

The next step is to apply your transfer tape over the entire image (3).  Now apply it to the prepared wood.  Use a flat card to burnish it to the wood (4).  This keeps the paint from going under the vinyl.

remove-transfer-paper

Carefully remove the transfer tape.  Use your finger and go over the vinyl to make sure that it is adhered to the wood good.

Using the color you want on top, paint over the entire image….vinyl and all.    Make sure there is not a lot of paint on your brush.  A couple of lighter coats is better than one thick coat.  If you do it too thick, the paint will get under the vinyl.

This is the step that you will hear different opinions on.  Some say to wait to remove the vinyl until it’s completely dry and others say to remove the vinyl while it is still a little wet.  I prefer doing it while it is still a little wet.  You can work on a scrap piece of wood and see what works best for you.

Here are the final results.  I’m really happy with the way it turned out.  Below are photos of some more signs I am still working on.

This one I’m going to sand the edges to give it a more rustic look.

For this one I’m going to add a frame to the bottom left.  I thought it needed a little something more.  It’s a little wood frame that I purchased at Hobby Lobby,  I’m going to paint it black.  That way you can add a photo of something or someone that you are Thankful for.

Another suggestion to try if you don’t want to paint is to simply add vinyl to an already painted plaque or piece of wood.  The possibilities are endless.  I hope that this tutorial was helpful and that you will give it a try….. ENJOY!!


TanyaAbout the Author  Tanya is a part of the hybrid team here at The Digital Press. She has been hybrid crafting for at least 14 years now, and loves creating and sharing those creations with others. Her all-time favorite tool is her Silhouette Cameo. She has been married for 28 years to her high school sweetheart, Richard and has two sons: Chris, 25 and Chance, 20. She also enjoys crocheting, photography and woodworking.

Hybrid How-To | Credit Card Sleeves

For the first time in 16 years, my credit card information was stolen. It was actually stolen twice. Both cards use the new EMV chip technology. The Thieving Scum used the information to generate a new, physical card, and they were having all kinds of super duper fun times in New York City. Not cool, Thieving Scum.

I was told by one of the Fraud Departments that the best way to prevent Thieving Scum from taking what isn’t theirs is to buy a foil-lined sleeve for each EMV-chipped card.

Well, I thought I could cute-ify this project a bit with some pretty scrapbooking paper.

Supplies

  • Card Sleeve Template (download my template HERE)
  • Digital Scrapbook Paper of your choice (I used Gratitude by Anita Designs)
  • White Cardstock
  • Tinfoil
  • Double-sided tape
  • Boxing tape (The cheaper, the better! You want it to be thin.)
  • Scissors

To start, clip your paper of choice to the template. Print and cut. I used my Silhouette for this, but the design is also simple enough to cut by hand.

Smooth out the foil and cut it to 2” x 6”. Adhere to the back of the card sleeve with double-sided tape…

2016_11_2_cardsleeves

Next we need to reinforce the foil so it doesn’t rip every time you slide the card in. I used two pieces of boxing tape, overlapping each edge a little. I used my scissors to cut away the excess around the edges.

Using the double-sided tape, adhere the flaps to the inside of the sleeve. This actually works better if you lay your card in the sleeve before taping. You don’t want the folds to be too tight. I reinforced the outside edges with more boxing tape

And there you have it! Here’s a look at two different sleeves I created…

If you give this project a try… come show us your final product in the gallery here at TDP! We’d love to see what you come up with. You can also join the monthly challenges for November (as you can earn points by creating this hybrid project!). Come check it out HERE.


Kate About the Author  Kate is on the hybrid team here at The Digital Press. She lives on the Utah/Colorado border with her husband, 5 kids, 10 chickens, and a dog named Gracie. She’s a city-born girl who found she’s really a country girl at heart. She can be found outside, barefoot, and probably in her garden.

Hybrid How-To | Halloween Decor

 

I love decorating for different seasons and holidays and my absolute favourite is to decorate for halloween. I love everything about Halloween …and today I am going to show you how to make a few fun decor items — Halloween candles and 3D stars.

All digital items I used for these projects can be found in the Fright | Kit by Sahin Designs here at The Digital Press.

 

First, we’ll do the stars.

I found a PDF template online for the star shape, but the lines were dotted, so I used it to make a PSD template that I could clip each of the papers to. I printed out different sizes using different combinations of papers. You can cut out your stars by hand, or using a digital cutter. Here’s an example of one of my stars before printing…


Once all my stars were cut out, I scored the fold lines. This is done on the back of the star from each tip, through the center to the other side.

Turn your stars over and fold each tip, aligning the other tips with other to get a precise fold. You only crease from the center to the tip, not the other side. Then fold in between the tips with valley folds, as shown here…

Here’s a look at the finished products… stars of all sizes!

Now for the candles.

Print your desired images onto tissue paper [for more detailed instructions on printing on tissue paper, you can refer to one of my previous posts here or Arielle’s post here].

Cut your tissue to size, and use a hairdryer to heat the candle. You will see the tissue “disappear” into the wax. Be careful, your hands may get get hot… just give them a break every now and then and work your way around the candle…

Here’s a look at the candles once the tissue paper image has adhered on/into the wax of the candles…

I also printed the frame from the kit in a few different sizes… and cut them out with my paper cutter (I use a Silhouette) to add on my wall, along with the stars…

And that’s it! So simple! If you give it a try, definitely come post your final product in the gallery (and even join the monthly Hybrid Challenge and earn points toward discounts and free stuff at TDP!).

Happy Halloween!


About the Author  Amanda found digital scrapbooking in 2006, as a paper scrapper who was frustrated with the limitations of paper scrapping products. She now loves to combine paper and digital products and techniques for her pages and projects. She is the wife of a Naval Officer and has two teenage children. She lives in Australia, and has also lived in the U.S and Malaysia and loves that she has had the opportunity to travel the world with her family.

Hybrid How-To | Halloween Countdown Decor

ahgordon_octhybrid_tdphead

Hello and HaPpY OcToBeR!!! And Happy Digital Scrapbook Day! Arielle here and I’m so glad you stopped by today! I have a great project that will get you all scrappy this weekend – snipping and gluing and layering – oh my! I’m going to show you how I designed this little Halloween Countdown decor, and give you some tips on creating your own Halloween decor!

Here are the supplies I used:

  • Digital Kit – Magic Hour by Mari Koegelenberg
  • Thin cardstock
  • Adhesives (I used an ATG gun & dimensionals)
  • Scissors and paper trimmer
  • Other embellishments such as buttons and twine.
  • Base material – you can adhere your decor to an adhesive magnet sheet to use on your fridge or a filing cabinet or you could mount it to black foam core.

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Step One – Design your project! I like to pick my kit and completely design my project In Photoshop before I print out the elements. That way I know everything will work together and I will only print what I need for the project.

I found this antique~y frame in another kit and blew it up, adjusted the threshhold settings and superimposed it over the star paper. I used some free spooky fonts, as well.

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(Once my design is complete, I divide all the elements onto separate sheets for printing. I usually throw in some extra elements in case I mis-cut something or I decide it needs a little something extra!)

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Step Two – Print your elements and gather your supplies! It’s always a great idea to add some buttons, gems, ribbon, twine… you get the idea – mix in some real stuff. It will be fun & you can’t get it wrong. I promise.

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Step Three – Trim out your elements. Yes, you could think of this as tedious… or you can realize it’s really therapeutic! I just love cutting out cute little things!

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Step Four – My frame paper printed really dark, so I went back in with a white pencil to add a little definition. Don’t be afraid to grab paint, glitter or other media to layer onto your project! It adds another dimension to your hybrid work!

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Step Five – Start layering! Pop up different layers with dimensional adhesives. It’s great when you can find them at different heights. Add some different textures, I used buttons and twine. (I added a couple enamel dots to the cat’s eyes, too!)

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(I made my own Halloween “sticker” by just leaving a white border as I trimmed around the word. I used a craft knife to cut out the space in the “H”. I added some depth to my paper flowers by pressing them into my palm to push the petals up!)

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Here’s the finished project! I still can’t decide if I want mine on my fridge or my wall, but I have both magnetic sheets and black foam core when I do! I’ll just trace around my frame, and trim the backing to size.

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Craft stores also sell all kinds of blank signs you could use as a base – canvas, chalkboard, wood, burlap. You could also make a hybrid Halloween banner or bunting, on paper or fabric. hey, you could even print out a bunch of these and let your kids decorate a tin can pencil holder or a cute garland!

Now it’s your turn! Want to try your hand at some hybrid Halloween decor? It can be as easy and as simple as you want it to be! Please come join us in The Digital Press’s forum for a fun challenge related to this tutorial! You can create an amazing item for yourself or someone you love AND earn points doing it! Points can later be cashed-in for discount coupons to the shop at the end of the month if you participate in the challenge system at The Digital Press!

Hybrid How-To | Halloween Stickers

Hello everyone, It’s Tanya here to show you step-by-step how to create your own (really cute) Halloween stickers!

I thought that stickers like these would make the perfect Halloween treat for school parties. You just never know when one of your child’s classmates might have a food allergy… and with all of the sugar they will be getting already, these will surely be a big hit! My boys are way to old for this, but I am excited to create a bunch and give them out on Halloween night!

Supplies Needed:

  • Your favorite Halloween-themed digital kit (I used FREAKIN ADORABLE 1.0 and FREAKIN ADORABLE 2.0 by Mari Koegelenberg and Danielle Engebretson, shown below)
  • Cutting machine (I use a Silhouette Cameo)
  • Printer
  • White shipping labels
  • 3 x 4 treat bags
  • Stapler (I use a mini stapler that came with colored staples)

The reason I chose these kits — there are just soooooo many fun elements to choose from! I chose 4 different elements from each kit and believe me, that was really hard to do because I wanted to use them all!

The first thing you need to do is to open the images/elements you are going to use in your cutting machine software (I’m using Silhouette Studio Designer Edition). Open your elements and simply drag them over to a new drawing area, as shown here…

Once you have decided on the images you will use, you will have to do a “trace” on each one in your software. This will tell the machine where to cut. This is also referred to as a Print and Cut.   Open the Trace menu and select the trace area (see the small black circle I drew near the upper right)…

Now uncheck the “High Pass Filter” and move the “Threshold” all the way to the right. You can see that the image is perfectly highlighted (see the circle and the arrow I drew to show the boxes you will click/change)…

At this stage, there are a few ways to let the machine know the cut area. The one I will be showing you is the Trace and Detach. To do this, simple click on “Trace and Detach” as shown here (see the small black arrow I drew near the right)…

Now you will click on the image and drag it off to the side. It is hard to see, but there will part of the image left behind (you can see this below; when I click and drag over where the image was, the dashed lines show up. This is the part to get rid of). After dragging a box over the leftover part, hit “delete.”

Continue to do this for all elements used…

Next, draw out a box. The dimensions of my box were 3.250 x 2.563. I was able to get six to a page. Resize the elements to fit inside your area. The size of your box and images will depend on the size of your treat bags.

Now, you will copy and paste into all spaces, as shown here…

Now it cutting time. First, you have to print the stickers onto the label sheet. To do this, make sure that your “registration marks” are on… and then send through your printer. It is important to have the registration marks on before you print. These marks tell the machine where to cut.

Next step is to go to the “Cut Settings.” Here, you will tell the machine where to cut and what type of materials you will be using. For this project we will need to send the sticker sheet through twice. The first time will be just a kiss cut; this will not cut the paper all the way through.

First cut: Only turn on the cut settings on the images. To do this, go through and click on each image and chose “Cut Edge.” You can double check to see if the box around the images is off — simply click on one and it should show “No Cut.”

Second cut: Now do the opposite. Go through and turn the cut marks OFF on the images and turn the box cutting lines ON. You will also choose “cardstock” for your material. This will cut all the way through, giving you little individual sticker sheets…

Now you can either peel the white area around your sticker off… or leave it on. I left it on because these particular labels have a “cut” through the back and doesn’t look quite right.

Now add your sticker sheets to the treat bags…

I created a cute topper (in Silhouette Studio Designer Edition) and stapled it to the top of each treat bag. You can even add your child’s name to the back of the treat for a nice finished touch…

Here’s a look at the finished product from the front of the sticker packages…

I hope that you have enjoyed this tutorial! Get your creative juices flowing and create some stickers for Halloween (or even for some other fun occasion… you could use any theme/kit you like!). If you give it a try, come share your creation in the September Hybrid Challenge thread in the forum. 🙂

 


TanyaAbout the Author  Tanya is a part of the hybrid team here at The Digital Press. She has been hybrid crafting for at least 14 years now, and loves creating and sharing those creations with others. Her all-time favorite tool is her Silhouette Cameo. She has been married for 28 years to her high school sweetheart, Richard and has two sons: Chris, 25 and Chance, 20. She also enjoys crocheting, photography and woodworking.

Hybrid How-To | Chipboard Elements

Supplies

  • Digital kit of your choice. I used the Jaunt Collection (papers, elements) by Sahin Designs.
  • Photo editing software (I’m using PSE)
  • Printable sticker paper
  • Chipboard (old cereal boxes work!)
  • Cutting machine (optional, but you’ll need to choose simple designs that can be cut by hand)
  • For the key ring charms: jump rings and split rings (in the jewelry-making aisle of the craft store)

Directions

Open the designs of your choice in photo editing software and resize to whatever you need.

If you’re doing the key ring charms and using a cutting machine, go ahead and make the holes for the rings now. Might as well let the machine do the work for you! If you’re not using a cutting machine, you’ll need to punch the holes after assembling the final product.

Now make a mirror copy of each non symmetrical design. In my case, I also changed the back of two designs to be coordinating paper. Just for fun. 🙂

The next step is to print a set of images on sticker paper and cut them out.  You’ll also need to cut the image shapes out of chipboard. I used my Silhouette for this part. The chipboard provides support for the element, and if you’re planning on using it on a layout or other project, it’ll pop off the page a bit for some added dimension.

After everything is printed and cut, all you need to do is peel the images off the sticker paper and place them on the front and back of the chipboard shape. If you’re making the charms and doing it by hand, now is the time to punch holes in them. I used a hook tool to do this on the sun element.

Next, open a jump ring. Attach a split ring and the chipboard element then close the jump ring.

Now you can add the charms to your key ring!


About the Author  Kate is on the hybrid team here at The Digital Press. She lives on the Utah/Colorado border with her husband, 5 kids, 10 chickens, and a dog named Gracie. She’s a city-born girl who found she’s really a country girl at heart. She can be found outside, barefoot, and probably in her garden.

Tutorial Tuesday | Rotating Homework Supply Station

 

Today I’m here to help teach you how to make a super easy project — a rotating homework station. This is a great way to keep all those school supplies in one place! It’s a really easy project, too… as we’ll basically just turn a lazy susan into a turntable homework station, using our favorite school-themed digital scrapbook kit.

Supplies Needed:

  • turntable & wood top
  • 4 soup cans (or similar; I used 26oz soup cans)
  • ribbon (optional)
  • magnets
  • scissors
  • school supplies
  • printer
  • card stock
  • digital papers (I used the following school-themed papers —  Star Student papers by Inside Pixels by Lisa Bell)…

 

Here’s a look at my supplies for this project. I chose to use 4 – 26oz soup containers; you could choose smaller cans and use one or two more, or you could even choose 3 larger cans… it’s up to you!)…

 

 

I purchased my 9″ turntable from Amazon. You can also find them at most kitchen supply stores. I wanted my platform to be a bit larger than the turntable, itself, so I added a 10″ round wooden top to my turntable.

 

 

Once the platform was secured to the turntable, I glued magnets on the top in the places where my cans would be placed.

Next, I printed some of the fun Star Student papers onto my card stock, and then trimmed them to fit my cans.

*TIP* When attaching the papers to your cans, you can hot glue the seams… or even just use glue dots to adhere the papers straight to the cans. You can even add a ribbon around the top of the cans, if you wish, as decoration (I didn’t).

 

 

Once the paper was attached to my cans, I placed the cans on the top of the magnets to hold them in place — to keep them from tipping over when rotating the turntable.

After that, we’re finally ready to fill the cans with our school supplies…

 

 

You can fill this with supplies for a teacher gift, use for a homeschool organization, college desk, craft area or anything else you can imagine!

If you have a central location where supplies are kept neat and tidy, it will be much more simple to finish your homework efficiently. Let me know if you give this a try… I’d love to see your results!

 


Terresa

About the Author  Terresa is a mother to 5 beautiful children. She loves capturing memories with her digital camera and creating a visual family memory book to be enjoyed and treasured. She enjoys designing and creating personalized items for her home and children. Other interests are crafting and gardening, and you will often find her enjoying the outdoors and soaking in the beauty of nature.

Hybrid How-To | Make Your Own Washi Tape

Washi tape has been a trend in scrapbooking for quite a while now, and I’ll admit to having quite a stash. I have about 3 favorites that I tend to use on every project, however… so I decided to make my own shorter versions using digital papers. I’m here today to teach you how to do the same!

STEP 1 — First, gather your supplies:

  • Tissue paper
  • Double-sided tape
  • Scissors
  • Digital papers (I used papers from Family Time by Meg Designs, and also from Count On Me by Anita Designs)…

STEP 2 — Next, in Photoshop you will open up a page as big as your printer will print. Pull a few of your favorite papers into Photoshop, and make strips down the page, as shown here…

*TIP* make the strips a little wider than the width of your tape, in order to leave some room in case you don’t lay the tape exactly straight in STEP 5

You may need to resize the papers, making them smaller and overlapping them, in order to create the right size pattern for the thin strip. If you look at the blue damask paper, above, you will see that the pattern really needed to be smaller to get the damask effect on the thin tape strip… so I shrunk the paper down, duplicated it, and overlapped it to get the repeating pattern correct.

Here’s a look at my final document in Photoshop, before I printed…

STEP 3 — Your next step will be to cut the tissue paper to the size of the paper that will go through your printer, and secure it to the end that feeds into your printer with double sided tape (I use thinner tape for this). This is because the tissue paper won’t usually feed through your printer on its own, without getting all jammed up (it’s just not thick enough). Adhering it to a thicker piece of plain copy paper ensures that it will make it through the printer without jamming up.

*TIP* I also iron my tissue paper slightly on a low setting (no steam), to ensure that it’s really flat — but this isn’t mandatory.

STEP 4 — Now you will print as many copies as you like, depending on how long you want your tape rolls to be.

STEP 5 — Attach your double-sided tape to the back of the printed tissue paper strips, joining the papers if you printed more than one sheet of the same pattern…

STEP 6 — After that, you will trim each of your new tape strips, cutting off the excess tissue that is wider than the double-sided tape. After that, you just need to roll up the strips…

STEP 7 — Have fun playing with your new tape! You can use your “limited edition” washi tape strips on everything from scrapbooking layouts… to hybrid cards… to planner pages… or anything else you can think of!  🙂


amandajane About the Author  Amanda found digital scrapbooking in 2006, as a paper scrapper who was frustrated with the limitations of paper scrapping products. She now loves to combine paper and digital products and techniques for her pages and projects. She is the wife of a Naval Officer and has two teenage children. She lives in Australia, and has also lived in the U.S and Malaysia and loves that she has had the opportunity to travel the world with her family.

 

Hybrid How-To | Decorated Envelopes

Hello and happy Saturday, Arielle here with quick little tutorial on making your own hybrid envelopes! Usually all of my mojo goes into creating cards, and obsessing over every detail… but I realized that I am missing an important part of the process – the envelope! Today I will show you how to make gorgeous, printable envelopes that take hardly any time at all, and will definitely make your snail mail “POP”.

Supplies Needed:

  • Digital kit of your choice (I used Bright Spark Elements and Bright Spark Papers by KimB Designs, shown below)
  • Paper
  • Paper trimmer or scissors
  • Scoring tool or a ruler
  • Adhesive (I used and ATG gun)
  • Envelope templates. (I found PDFs at SplitCoastStampers here [for 41/4” square cards] and here [for cards 41/4 x 51/2“])

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Design:

  1. Open the pdf template in your photo editing program.
  2. Add some paper and elements. (I took parts of the hybrid card I made and added them here to make a matching envelope!)
  3. Print! (I left the lines showing so you could see, but before I print, I usually decrease the opacity of the template to 35% – just enough to be able to see to cut it.)

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To Assemble:

  1. Cut along the outer lines of the envelope.
  2. Using a straight edge, or a paper scoring tool, fold in the sides.
  3. Apply your adhesive to the flaps and adhere.

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And that’s it — easy as pie!

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Here’s a couple others I made… this one is to match a card I made last week…

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with the One Kit Two Way | Girl Power shop collab and Dashies Vol. 1 by Laura Banasiak.

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And here’s a little “artsy” one…

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using Creashen’s Flora Life No. 1 and Brushies No. 2.

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And here are the finished envelopes…

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Now it’s your turn, make a decorated envelope and come share your creation with us in the forum! During August 2016, you can even receive points in TDP’s challenge system if you complete this project and enter it into the August 2016 Hybrid Challenge. 🙂


Arielle H GordonAbout the author  Arielle H Gordon is a wife and mom of two crazy kiddos, ages 6.5 & 8. She moved around (a lot!) before returning to settle down in her hometown of Enterprise, Alabama, to marry her sweetheart and start her family. She is an avid crafter — digital, hybrid and otherwise! She LOVES Jesus, family time, camping, gardening, reading cozy mysteries, hot tea, popcorn, and anything on BBC! This time of year, you’ll find her reading like it’s going out of style, going to the gym, or in the car-pick-up line! 

Hybrid How-To | Custom Composition Books

Hello and happy Saturday! Summer is quickly coming to an end. Can you believe it? My kids go back to school in 2 weeks and we’ve been busy getting their supplies. I noticed both kids have composition notebooks on their lists — woohoo! Why have a plain notebook, when you can have a fantabulous notebook? I thought it might be fun to create some personalized covers, and am here today to show you how to use your favorite digital kit to do so!

For my own composition book cover, I included a happy memory from my kids’ previous school year, as well as a little inspirational quote. I even left a blank space to write in the subject. I’m also putting a blank sheet of adhesive on the back, too, so the kids can add their own personal touch! Anything to keep them motivated, right?

Supplies Needed:

  • Digital kit of your choice (I used Project Twenty Fifteen | August by Laura Passage, shown below)
  • Full sheet adhesive labels (I used Avery #15265)
  • Paper trimmer, scissors, pencil, and a ruler
  • Composition notebook(s) of any size

 

Directions:

  1. Measure the cover of your notebook.
  2. Create a document in Photoshop that is the exact size of your book’s cover — plus an extra 1/4″ on the top and bottom (this will ensure the design you are about to create will cover the front of the notebook).
  3. Print your design onto the full-sheet adhesive label sheet.
  4. Using the paper trimmer, trim the excess from the left side of your design, the side closest to the binding tape of the book. Don’t peel the backing off yet! First, you will center it and mark where you’ll need to cut the other 3 sides. Trim those before adhering.
  5. Start to peel the backing from the left side, only a half inch or so, and adhere it starting on the left. Then slowly continue to peel back an inch or so at a time, as you adhere it. Doing it this way not only ensures you get it centered, but also eliminates pesky air bubbles!
  6. Using the scissors, trim around the corners.
  7.  Optional — If you want it to be just a little more permanent, add clear contact paper on top of your cover.

And that’s it — easy peasy!

Now it’s your turn, make one of these super simple comp books and come share your creation with us in the forum! During July 2016, you can even receive points in TDP’s challenge system if you complete this project and enter it into the July 2016 Hybrid Challenge. 🙂

 


Arielle H GordonAbout the author  Arielle H Gordon is a wife and mom of two crazy kiddos, ages 6 & 7. She moved around (a lot!) before returning to settle down in her hometown of Enterprise, Alabama, to marry her sweetheart and start her family. She is an avid crafter — digital, hybrid and otherwise! She LOVES Jesus, family time, camping, gardening, reading cozy mysteries, hot tea, popcorn, and anything on BBC! This time of year, you’ll find her buying school supplies, gearing up for VBS and reading like it’s going out of style (while sipping sweet tea!)…

 

Hybrid How-To | 4th of July Party Favors

Summer is in full force, heat and all. So many fun things happen during the summer… vacations, pool parties, barbecues, and more — including the 4th of July! A lot of people celebrate the 4th with food, family, friends, games, and lots of fireworks. I love the 4th, and the meaning behind the celebration, so I decided to do make some 4th of July party favors. It’s easy, and I’m going to teach you how in today’s Hybrid How-To post!

For this project I used the …And the Pursuit of Happiness | Kit & the coordinating digital stamp set set (which is also mobile-ready!) — both designed by Laura Passage. I also used the Gingham Style collab collection by The Digital Press Design Team (from back in April 2015).

I am a Silhouette girl… and I use the SSDE (Silhouette Studio Designer Edition) for almost everything. I find that even some of the more difficult things are easier to do in this software over Photoshop Elements (PSE). I still use PSE for my all of my scrapbooking, however.

First, I opened this pillow box file I already had in my stash of hybrid files. I re-sized it until two of them fit onto an 8.5″ x 11″ page. *NOTE* there is no need to turn on registration the marks here, but do make sure the cut lines are on.

Then, I used SSDE to cut out my project on clear cardstock. I loooove clear cardstock! It can be purchased online. It is a little thicker than the acetate sheets that I used in my floating ornament tutorial. I put my cardstock onto the cutting mat, loaded it, and cut. The cut settings are “chipboard, blade on 7 and double cut.” Then, to assemble it… I just used one strip of double side tape on the edge.

Next, I filled my new pillowbox container! I used fireball candies to fill this one. I think the finished product will be cute in a little basket on the treat table at a party. I also filled another pillowbox container with little firecracker pops.

The next step was to embellish the pillow box. I drew out long strips and used various digital papers from the kits to fill them in. I also opened up a few element files (using the star shapes, and stamps from the mobile-ready font & stamp set) and put them on the same page.  Again, no need to turn on the registration marks in SSDE, because after printing I will cut them out with my scissors.

Here’s a look at some of the pieces after I printed them out, as I was cutting them out…

Next, I combined the paper strips with the other elements — attaching them with double sided tape. I also embellished with ribbon. How cute are they?

This next one is the one I filled with the firecracker snaps (you throw them on the ground to pop)…

Now, to make the sparkler holder. These will be presented as a “Thank You” gift for coming to our 4th of July festivities…

For this part of my project, I used Silhouette Studio. To design the holder, I used elements from all three products.

 

You can print and use scissors (or an exacto knife) to cut around the opening… OR… if you have a Silhouette, you can turn on your registration marks and do a print and cut. As you can see, the design is past the registration marks — and that is okay because I will cut that part with my scissors. You can see here that I have cut marks around only part of the middle part of the design. I did this by tracing the “circle” part of the design and cutting part of it away. This is to ensure that it would only cut a small opening for the sparklers to fit through.

You can see here in this next image where it cut (I put the sparklers through the opening so that you can see what I mean)…

The part that goes past the registration marks will not cut. That is okay for this project. I simply took my scissors and cut out the rest.

I backed the sparkler holder to make it a little more sturdy. To do this, I started out by drawing out a 8.5″ x 11″ shape then filled it with paper from the …And the Pursuit of Happiness kit. To get the shape of the template, I mirrored the image and turned on my cut lines before printing. After printing, I cut it out with my machine. You do not have to use the registration marks for this part of the project. If you don’t want to go through all the steps above, you can simply print the paper and cut a strip with your paper cutter or scissors. It just won’t cover the back of the banner on the sides… but I think that would be just fine, and a lot quicker!

 

After cutting, adhere with double sided tape…

What a fun party favor! You could always add more details, as well… like the year, your name, etc.

This project was really fun. There are so many more things you can make for your party. I’m thinking of things like cupcake toppers, garland, and food tags… just to name a few. Let your creativity run wild!

I hope that you enjoy giving these fun projects a try, and I also hope you have a safe and Happy 4th of July weekend! Thanks so much for stopping by the blog today!


TanyaAbout the Author  Tanya is a part of the hybrid team here at The Digital Press. She has been hybrid crafting for at least 12 years now, and loves creating and sharing those creations with others. Her all-time favorite tool is her Silhouette Cameo. She has been married for 26 years and has two sons: Chris, 24 and Chance, 20. She also enjoys crocheting, photography and woodworking.

Hybrid How-To | Straw Rockets

Are you ready for something fun and easy? I found this simple project on Pinterest, and knew it would be the perfect way for my littles to spend a summer afternoon.

Supplies Needed:

  • Digital image of your choice (I used the rocket from County Fair, seen below)
  • Cardstock
  • Scissors
  • Hot Glue
  • Curling ribbon (optional)
  • Straw

Directions:

  1. Print out the image you want and cut it out. Before printing, make sure the image is the size you want. It shouldn’t be too small; I actually ended up making the rocket from the kit a little bit bigger.

  1. Next, cut a rectangle of out of plain paper (I just used some scratch paper). It needs to be a little longer than your image.
  1. Roll the rectangle paper around a pencil and glue the edge together to form a tube. Pinch one end of the tube and glue together so that the end is sealed. At this point, I decided to glue some curling ribbon to the bottom of my rocket. Next, glue the tube to the back of the image.

 

And that’s it!

Now you can slide the tube over the top of the straw… and blow to make it fly. 🙂


Kate

 

About the Author  Kate is on the hybrid team here at The Digital Press. She lives on the Utah/Colorado border with her husband, 5 kids, 10 chickens, and a dog named Gracie. She’s a city-born girl who found she’s really a country girl at heart. She can be found outside, barefoot, and probably in her garden.